Monday, February 19, 2018

Pop Art Wood




Lesson Objective: Students will learn about the Pop Art Movement. Students will create a Pop Art Food Sculpture in the style of the Pop Art Movement and Texture 

Project Requirements: 
Sketchbook: Create a full-color drawing of final food sculpture 
Include: Details
Texture
Pop Art Elements 
Final Project: 
Construction includes fully realized food structure
Student uses the additive construction method 
Details include accurate food texture and detail
Pop art sculpture is complete from all sides and is in keeping with pop art style

Assessment: 
Informal: Small group written critique
Formal: Artist Statement
Formal: Grading final sculpture

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Powerpoint with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques, group activities to check for understanding
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Powerpoint with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 
Advanced art students will be asked to increase the difficulty of their final sculpture They will also be expected incorporate more details and principles into the final project

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit contrast, Color, Repetition, and Pattern from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh earlier learning.  Notes on Art history, Key Vocabulary and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final sculpture will be demo started in class using guided instruction. 

Art Link: 
Compare Pop art and Op art
What is pop short for
What artist do you associate with Pop art? 
If you had to create a Pop art project what would you create? 

INTRODUCTION to the lesson (Anticipatory Set): 
Show Wayne Thiebaud’s ice cream
Analyze
Describe
Interpret

Key Vocabulary:
Pop Art
Texture
Physical Texture
Visual texture
CA STANDARDS: 
1.1 Analyze and discuss complex ideas, such as color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual in works of art.
1.3 Research and analyze the work of an artist and write about the artist's distinctive style and its contribution to the meaning of the work.
1.6 Describe the use of the elements of art to express mood in one or more of their works of art.
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
2.1 Create original works of art of increasing complexity and skill in a variety of media that reflect their feelings and points of view.
2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, expressive content, and real versus virtual.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.4 Articulate the process and rationale for refining and reworking one of their own works of art.
5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the symbols and images.
5.3 Prepare portfolios of their original works of art for a variety of purposes 

INSTRUCTION: 
Students will receive details about Pop Art
Pop Artists
Texture in art
MATERIALS: 
Craft Sticks
Coffee stirrers
Wooden blocks
Small Wood pieces

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Day 1: PowerPoint Presentation Pop Art
Opening: Art Link:
What is pop short for?
When you hear the words Pop Art what artist comes to mind? 
If you were asked to create a Pop Art project, what would you 
Create? 
Pre-assessment: Sketchbook: Wayne Thiebaud’s Ice Cream Cones
How does this art effect you? 
Review: Describe, analyze, interpret
Teacher Models: 
Pop Art and art History
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors throughout discussion
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion to be sure notes are being taken 
Presentation assessment
Art Activity: Critique Roy Lichtenstein’s Flag 
Think-Pair-Share Table Groups
Describe, Analyze, Interpret
Discussion: Pop Art
History
Pop Art defined
Pop Art Characteristics
TEXTURE: 
Texture: 
Discussion: Texture and Color
What is Texture? 
Physical Texture
Visual Texture
Teacher Models: 
Texture
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors throughout discussion
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion to be sure notes are being taken 
Presentation assessment
ART HISTORY: Indirect Instruction
Each table will receive research paper on one of nine artists
Students will read, collect data and present one artist to the class as a
Group
The presentation will be of a group artwork inspired by their artist. 
Artwork must be of the subject matter most identified with the artist
Artwork must include characteristics of the artist
Students will aid in instruction by researching one of nine artists and sharing the information with the class. 
Students will take notes in their sketchbook about each of the nine artists
Wayne Theibaud
Jasper johns
Andy Warhol
Jim Dine
Roy Lichtenstein
Tom Wesselman
Claes Oldenburg
David Hockney
Robert Indiana

Day 3: Art Link: ART HISTORY: Wayne Thiebaud
VIDEO
Critique works of dessert
Color 
Texture
ART HISTORY: Barbara Spring 
Barbara Spring (1916- 2011)  94 years old
An exceptional wood sculptor, 
Barbara Spring's career began in 1935 in her native England 
She studied at the Gravesend School of Art in Kent and the Central School of Art in London. 
Her exhibits in this country span from 1962 to present.
Actively worked at the studio she built in 1972 next to her home in Big Sur. 
"Barbara is Magic.” "She can give an ordinary face so much emotion," says Greg Hawthorne of the Hawthorne Gallery, where much of her work is exhibited. 
She pokes fun at the human frailties of her characters, their pettiness, self-importance, and self-doubt
Spring's gentle sense of humor makes them sympathetically engaging. 
Her keen observation of human nature and genius for creating the subtlest nuances are further enhanced by punning titles like "Major Faupar" and "Upton O'Goode".
Sketchbook Activity: 
Begin to sketch your final wood project
Sketchbook Activity: 
Continue to sketch your final wood project add texture and color
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion to be sure notes are being taken 
Presentation assessment
Students will use texture (wood chips, saw dust) to achieve an emotion or mood








1 comment:

  1. LOVELY blog.. It's help to all.

    We conduct Creative Workshops a fun, interesting and therapeutic experience for participants.

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