Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Graffiti Stencil Project



Lesson Objective: Using Stencils, create a work of art with a message based on Graffiti History. 

Key Vocabulary: 
Graffiti is writing or drawings that have been scribbled, scratched, or sprayed illicitly on a wall in  public place.
   Stencil: a thin sheet of cardboard, plastic, or metal with a pattern or letters cut out of it, used to produce   the cut design on the surface below by the application of ink or paint through the holes.
Iconography: the visual images and symbols used in a work of art or the interpretation 
Symbols are something represented in the work of art—an object, an action, or a pattern
Symbols can be nonrepresentational item such as a color or a line

Materials: 
Crayola Air Brush
Crayola Markers
Heavy paper to cut stencils 
Cutting board
xacto Knives

Focus art: Graffiti 

CA Art Standards
1.5 Analyze the material used by a given artist and describe how its use influences the meaning of the work.
2.6 Create a two or three-dimensional work of art that addresses a social issue.
3.4 Discuss the purposes of art in selected contemporary cultures.
4.1 Articulate how personal beliefs, cultural traditions, and current social, economic, and political contexts influence the interpretation of the meaning or message in a work of art.
4.2 Compare the ways in which the meaning of a specific work of art has been affected over time because of changes in interpretation and context.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.2 Create a work of art that communicates a cross-cultural or universal theme taken from literature or history.

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit art elements from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh previous knowledge.  Notes on color, scale and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final project will be demo started in class using guided instruction.

Direct instruction:
Graffiti is writing or drawings that have been scribbled, scratched, or sprayed illicitly on a wall in  public place.
Graffiti ranges from written words to wall paintings, and it has existed since ancient times

Examples date back to Ancient Egypt & Ancient Greece
Both "graffiti" and its singular form "graffito" are from the Italian word graffiato ("scratched"). 
"Graffiti" in art history: works of art produced by scratching a design into a surface. 
Spray Paint and marker pens have become the most commonly used graffiti materials. 
In most countries, marking or painting property without the property owner's consent is considered defacement and vandalism, which is a punishable crime.
1981: Fab 5 Freddy's friendship with Debbie Harry influenced Blondie's single "Rapture" 
The video featured Jean-Michel Basquiat, and offered the first glimpse of a depiction of elements of graffiti in hip hop culture. 
1980’s Keith Haring was another well-known graffiti artist who brought Pop Art and graffiti to the commercial mainstream. 
Then we saw the emergence of the new stencil graffiti genre. Some of the first examples were created in 1981
Banksy starts using stencils almost exclusively by 2000
Works of art may not only have subject matter, they may also contain symbols
   
 Stencil: a thin sheet of cardboard, plastic, or metal with a pattern or letters cut out of it, used to produce the cut design on the surface below by the application of ink or paint through the holes.
Iconography: the visual images and symbols used in a work of art or the interpretation 
Symbols are something represented in the work of art—an object, an action, or a pattern

Symbols can be nonrepresentational item such as a color or a line
To become a symbol, people have to adopt or accept
The cross is a symbol of Christianity,  symbol of suffering
The Sun as the symbol of life and strength 
River is the symbol of eternal change/flowing
The eagle on the standard of America symbolizes strength
Emojis as symbols
Emoji facts: 
USA loves pizza emoji
Canada Loves poop emoji
Australia loves party symbols
Over all mostly happy faces

Project Requirements: 
Sketchbook: Students will complete a study of their stencils, repetition, overlapping, movement as a drawing. 
Their drawing should include a five symbols and a social/cultural message through color and symbols (Iconography)
They will finish their drawing using color.
Submit sketch to Morrison for Final paper
Students must create at least 5 stencils in card stock
Final Project: Using created stencils, student will use overlapping, repetition, pictures and symbols that represent you or your message as an artist. 

Using knowledge gained from the year, address several principles of art: Balance, Scale,  Rhythm, Unity, Movement, Emphasis, Contrast, Pattern





Mixed Media Collage Final Project






Mixed Media Collage Reproduction
• Must create a reproduction of work by any famous artist. 
• Minimum 12” X 18” 
Must incorporate: 
Blind contour
Create depth and/or perspective
Shading and value to create form:
USE ONE: Stippling, scumbling, hatching, cross hatching, etc. 
Tessellation OR Op art reference
Pop Art reference
One of the following: Oval action figure, gestural figure OR portrait
Visual and/or tactile texture
Color, emotion, mood
Newspaper and/or magazine 
Paint (watercolor or acrylic) 
Oil Pastel
Graphite pencil drawing
Pen and ink (sharpie OR black ink pen)
  • Required: Please complete the artist statement and final rubric. Blue tape both on the back.
  • Required: Title of work: incorporate original artist’s name into your title. 
  • One day to find your fine art inspiration
  • Four days of studio time, three days of independent work. 
  • Due with presentation, including: why you chose the artwork and how you incorporated each requirement. 

Final meets California Art Standards: 

  • 1.8 Analyze the works of a well-known artist as to the art media selected and the effect of that selection on the artist's style.
  • 2.1 Create original works of art of increasing complexity and skill in a variety of media that reflect their feelings and points of view.
  • 2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual.
  • 2.4 Demonstrate in their own works of art a personal style and an advanced proficiency in communicating an idea, theme, or emotion.
  • 2.6 Present a universal concept in a multimedia work of art that demonstrates knowledge of technology skills.
  • 3.2 Identify contemporary artists worldwide who have achieved regional, national, or international recognition and discuss ways in which their work reflects, plays a role in, and influences present-day culture. (artist statement question)
  • 4.1 Describe the relationship involving the art maker (artist), the making (process), the artwork (product), and the viewer.
  • 5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the symbols and images.













Crumpled Movement Landscape



Lesson Objective: Observe, identify and create movement in a landscape work. 

Key Vocabulary: 
Rhythm: Principle of Art: Art elements (line shape, value, color, texture) recur regularly. Like a dance it will have a flow of objects that will seem to be like the beat of music. 
Movement: Principle of Art: Art Principle:  the path the viewer's eye takes through the artwork, often to a focal area.
Watercolor: is a painting method in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water-based solution. Watercolor refers to both the medium and the resulting artwork.
Landscape is ANY picture of the outdoors
Foreground: The part of the picture that is closest to you.
Perspective: things look bigger when they are closer to you.
Middleground: The part of the picture in the middle.
Background is up by the Top of your paper. 
“Rule of Thirds” can be key to creating balance in landscape painting
Opacity: (O-pa-city):the condition of lacking transparency or translucence; opaqueness. 

Materials: 
Drawing Supplies: Colored pencils, drawing pencils, oil pastels
Watercolors
Watercolor Paper
One scrap paper per student: crumpled

Focus Artist: Van Gogh

CA Art Standards: 
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
1.5 Analyze the material used by a given artist and describe how its use influences the meaning of the work.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
2.4 Review and refine observational drawing skills.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.0 CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS: Students apply what they learn in the visual arts across subject areas.

Project Requirements: 
Sketchbook: Practice drawing a crumpled piece of paper on a blank sheet of your sketchbook. 
Turn that drawing of paper into hills on the horizon. 
Draw in the background and foreground. 
Use oil pastels and watercolors to create movement. 

Final Project: Student used blind contour technique to draw crumpled paper mountain range.
Student added interest, rhythm and movement to create landscape using oil pastels and watercolor. 
Student followed landscape procedures to add interest in foreground and background. 
Student used the “rule of three” and color to create emphasis.

Direct Instruction from Power Point: 
Landscape is ANY picture of the outdoors

The Foreground: The part of the picture that is closest to you. 
The foreground is at the bottom of the paper. 
Things in the foreground look big, have more detail and are darker
Perspective: things look bigger when they are closer to you.

The Middleground:
The part of the picture in the middle. 
The middle ground is part way between the foreground and the background.
It is that part of the picture that  is farthest away from you. 

The Background is up by the Top of your paper. 
Things in the background look smaller, less detail and lighter because they are farther away. 

Overlapping is when one thing seems to cover up another thing, even just a little. When this happens, the thing that looks like it is on top is the thing that’s closest to you.

COLOR and Landscape: Warm and cool – Use the power of warm and colors to add even more depth. 
Add a red highlight in the foreground to bring your viewers gaze forward and to heighten the effect. 
Warm in the foreground cools in the background
Color becomes less and less saturated (intense) as it disappears into the distance.
Everything gets lighter in value as the distance from the viewer increases
As the landscape hits the horizon line it is often very similar in value to the sky.

Balance in three’s 
The nature of something’s ingredients or constituents; the way in which a whole or mixture is made up.
2. The action of putting things together; formation or construction.
3 is the magic number: Balance
Composition is about variety just “don’t make any two things the same”

The “Rule of Thirds” can be key to creating balance in landscape painting
Divide your page horizontally into 3.
2. Decide whether to have your horizon on the top third or the bottom third 
(the bottom third is always easier to balance, it helps to make the sky look vast and imposing).
3. Split the vertical into thirds.
4. Align areas of focus at the intersection between the lines.

Vincent  van Gogh 
(1853 – 1890)
Dutch Post-Impressionist painter 
His work had a far-reaching influence on 20th century art
Known for his  vivid colors and emotional impact.
Van Gogh did not begin painting until his late twenties
Best-known works were produced during his final two years. 
He produced more than 2,000 artworks, consisting of around 900 paintings and 1,100 drawings and sketches. 
His work was a strong influence on the Modernist art that followed. 
Today many of his pieces—including his numerous self portraits, landscapes, portraits and sunflowers—are among the world's most recognizable and expensive works of art.
Known for his paint application creating texture and movement.
He suffered from anxiety and increasingly frequent bouts of mental illness throughout his life,
died largely unknown, at the age of 37
Sold only one painting while he was alive

Rhythm: Principle of Art: Art elements (line shape, value, color, texture) recur regularly. Like a dance it will have a flow of objects that will seem to be like the beat of music. 

Movement: Principle of Art: Art Principle:  the path the viewer's eye takes through the artwork, often to a focal area.

Watercolor: is a painting method in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water-based solution. Watercolor refers to both the medium and the resulting artwork.

Opacity: (O-pa-city):the condition of lacking transparency or translucence; opaqueness. 
Oil Pastel History: 1947 Picasso Convinced Henri Sennelier, a French manufacturer who specialized in high quality art products, to develop a fine arts version. 
In 1949 Sennelier produced the first oil pastels intended for professionals and experienced artists.

Oil Pastel TECHNIQUE: Press hard, Should look like paint, If your hand hurts, you are doing it right









Color Theory Art Supplies


Lesson Objective: Study Josef Albers and Color Theory 
Apply knowledge to a still life of art supplies done in 9 different color schemes
Key Vocabulary: 
Hue is the term given to the various colors we perceive e.g., red, blue, green, red-purple, Value is the lightness or darkness of a hue
Value is higher (lighter) when there is more lightness. (Tint)
Value is lower (darker) when the hue appears darker. (Shade)
Saturation, purity of color, refers to the comparison of a color to a neutral gray 
Neutral gray is achromatic 
Full color is fully saturated/pure and brilliant: Chroma
Saturation levels vary with different hues:
The most intense yellow appears brighter than the most intense blue-green. For any hue, saturation ranges from 0 percent (neutral gray) to 100% (maximum saturation). 
At maximum level, 100%, color appears pure and contains no gray
Contrast: refers to one object's difference in color and luminance compared to its surroundings or background. Black and white Highest possible Contrast 
Scale refers to relating size to a constant, such as a human body.
Color Theory: is a body of practical guidance to color mixing and the visual effects of a specific color combinations
Complementary colors: Opposite on color wheel (High Contrast) 
A Hue will appear darker on lighter background and lighter on darker background
Proportion is the size relationship of parts to a whole and to one another. 

Materials: 
12x12 card stock
Colored pencils
Sharpies
Still life of art supplies

Focus Artist: Josef Albers 
Project requirements: 
Create a Slotted color sculpture exploring color relationships 
Sketchbook: Students will draw color plans for each square of their project and
submit plans for approval. Required: 
9 Different color schemes
Student/teacher should be able to easily identify theme

Project: Create 12x12 study on paper exploring Josef Albers studies on color
Precision: Focused effort on end result 
Assessment: 
Informal: Written Peer Critique
Formal: Artist Statement
Formal: Grading final sculpture

CA STANDARDS: 
1.1 Identify and use the principles of design to discuss, analyze, and write about visual aspects in the environment and in works of art, including their own. 
1.3 Research and analyze the work of an artist and write about the artist's distinctive style and its contribution to the meaning of the work.
1.5 Analyze the material used by a given artist and describe how its use influences the meaning of the work.
2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual. 
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the images

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 

Color has a huge effect on our daily lives.
Everyday our emotions, moods,  physical sensation (appetite) are influenced by the colors that surround us.
There are three (3) properties to color:  
Hue: the name we give to a color (red, blue, etc.).
Intensity: refers to the strength/vividness of the color. For example, we may describe the color blue as "royal" (bright, rich, vibrant) or "dull" (grayed).
Value: meaning its lightness or darkness. Shade and Tint are in reference to value changes in colors.

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit color and line from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh earlier learning.  Notes on color, scale and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final sculpture will be demo started in class using guided instruction.

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Day 1 and 2: Power Point Presentation Color and Albers
Pre-assessment: Science and Art
Opening: Art Link: Quote from Albers on Science and Art
Review: Elements of art 
Discussion: Color
Key Vocabulary featured on PPT with visuals: 
Hue
Value
Intensity
Chroma
Saturation
Contrast 
Complementary Colors
Simultaneous Contrast 
Successive Contrast 
Color Schemes (relationships)

ART HISTORY: Josef Albers
Josef Albers (1888 – 1976)
German-born American artist and educator 
He worked, both in Europe and in the United States
Taught at Yale University
He formed the basis for the most influential and far-reaching art education programs of the 20th century.
Alber’s had an endless fascination with color discrepancy: 
How colors look when seen one at a time 
How they appear in different combinations
Color Theory: The study of Color 
Albers noted experiencing color varies based on individual personalities and factors like hue, dimension, and placement.
1949-1976, Josef Albers created a series of paintings titled Homage to the Square. 
Experience is the best teacher of color. 
There is no shortcut to your 10,000 hours towards mastery of this subject. 
Unless you experiment with colors the way Albers prescribes, you will not fully comprehend how the exact same color:
 Looks different in small quantity vs. large quantity 
 Looks different surrounded by another color. 
Color is constantly related to its neighbors and to changing light conditions.
Albers chose the square for its neutrality
He felt that such a common shape would not distract viewers from their experience of color. 
To create a "pure" experience, he applied his pigments directly from the tubes.
Spread pigments in thin layers onto the surface of the canvas (No Texture)
Studied color with paint on paper
Avoids mixing paint
Saves time and materials
Gain active interest, no prep
Precision of tone, light and surface quality
No texture (i.e. brush strokes)
Intensity is a synonym for magnitude or strength.
Contrast: refers to one object's difference in color and luminance compared to its surroundings or background.
Black and white
Complementary colors: Opposite on color wheel
Monochromatic colors are all the colors (tints, tones, and shades) of a single hue. 
Huedoku: Students play the app Huedoku to see their learning at work. The app is created from Albers studies and allows students to place colors in the right order based on hue. Students will both watch and play. Student playing will be active in color placement students watching will observe how color changes based on its neighbors. 

Review each Color scheme on last slide to check for understanding 
Teacher Models: 
Color throughout discussion 
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors throughout discussion
The game Huedoku on how to play with three color boxes 
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion ensure comprehension and active note taking 
Students play the Huedoku App with 4 color boxes and higher


Project: 
Day one: Students complete study of ideas in their sketchbook. 
Ideas should include various art supplies, 9 boxes and different color schemes
Day two: Students continue with their plans and submit for approval and large paper
Day three students begin on large paper by scaling up ideas to meet the 12x12 paper
Day four: students begin to map out each color scheme considering foreground, background etc. 
Day 5,6,7: student implement ideas through precision and knowledge 
Final product should include Light, Shadow and Value
Day 8: Critique 

Day 9: submit final work for a grade. 






Monday, February 15, 2016

Color Wheel Perspective



Objective:  Students will create a color wheel using one point perspective, accurate color placement and value 

CA Art Standards
1.1 Identify and use the principles of design to discuss, analyze, and write about visual aspects in the environment and in works of art, including their own.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
2.2 Prepare a portfolio of original two-and three-dimensional works of art that reflects refined craftsmanship and technical skills.
3.2 Identify and describe the role and influence of new technologies on contemporary works of art.
4.2 Compare the ways in which the meaning of a specific work of art has been affected over time because of changes in interpretation and context.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.0: Students apply what they learn in the visual arts across subject areas. 

Materials: 
Tag Board
Color Pencils 

Key Vocabulary: 
Hue, Value, One point Perspective, tertiary

Direct Instruction 
Color has a huge effect on our daily lives.
Everyday our emotions, moods,  physical sensation (appetite) are influenced by the colors that surround us.
There are three (3) properties to color:  
Hue: the name we give to a color (red, blue, etc.).
Intensity: refers to the strength/vividness of the color. For example, we may describe the color blue as "royal" (bright, rich, vibrant) or "dull" (grayed).
Value: meaning its lightness or darkness. Shade and Tint are in reference to value changes in colors.
One-point perspective -contains only one vanishing point on the horizon line. 
This type of perspective is typically used for images of roads, railway tracks, hallways, or buildings viewed so that the front is directly facing the viewer.
Color Theory: is a body of practical guidance to color mixing and the visual effects of a specific color combinations

Teacher Models 
Examples of vocabulary on the board throughout discussion 
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors room throughout discussion
Step by Step modeling on how to create color wheel

Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion ensure comprehension and active note taking 
Various Activities Designed to check/enhance student comprehension

Project requirements:
Sketchbook: student uses sketchbook to complete studies on one point perspective and building details using a ruler
Final project: Student applies sketchbook skills onto final paper to create building color wheel
Student creates color wheel showing primary, secondary and tertiary colors
Student shows the shade, tint and pure color of 12 colors on the color wheel
Student added unique details on each of the 12 buildings using black ink
Final project is well thought out and executed
Student takes advantage of studio time by illustrating full effort in actions and final results. 











Sunday, January 24, 2016

Tessellation Pattern Project




Lesson Objective
Work with elements of art: Line, shape
Work with Principles of Art: Pattern 
Draw connections between Art and Math to increase Engagement.  

Key Vocabulary: A tessellation is created when a shape is repeated over and over again covering a plane without any gaps or overlaps.
"tessellate" means to arrange small squares in a checkered or mosaic pattern. 
The word "tessellate" is derived from the Greek word "tesseres," which in English means “four."
Regular Tessellation: made up of congruent regular polygons. 
Regular means that the sides and angles of the polygon are all equivalent: EQUAL.

Materials: 
12x 12 Tag Board 
Pencil
4”x4” template 
Scissors 

Focus Artist/s: MC Escher

Project Requirements
Create a repeated Tessellation pattern. Complete the pattern with a changing mammal 
Assessment: 
Informal: Sketchbook studies
Formal: Oral Self Critique
Formal: Artist Statement
Formal: Grading final sculpture

CA STANDARDS: 
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
Impact of Media Choice
1.5 Analyze the material used by a given artist and describe how its use influences the meaning of the work.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
2.2 Prepare a portfolio of original two-and three-dimensional works of art that reflects refined craftsmanship and technical skills.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.4 Demonstrate an understanding of the various skills of an artist, art critic, and philosopher of art (aesthetician).

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques, group activities to check for understanding
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 
Advanced art students will be asked to increase the difficulty of their final tessellation They will also be expected incorporate more details and art principles into the final project

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit  shape from the earlier learning for cubism. We will use similar visuals to refresh earlier learning.  Notes on Art history, Key Vocabulary and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final project.  will be demo step by step instruction in class using guided instruction. 

Anticipatory Set: Art Link: 
Art Link: Are Math and Art Related? 
Complete Handout and turn it in for sketchbook grade. 
Pre-assessment  form
Students fill out pre-assessment on their own
Large Group Activity
Address pre-assessment questions as a large group to assess prior knowledge
Large Group Discussion on Art and Math 

OBJECTIVE: Introduce the concept of Art and Math Connection through the artwork of M.C. Escher. Allow students to solve the visual arts problem of creating a Repeating pattern using the tessellation format. 

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Power Point Presentation Tessellations
Pre-assessment: Questionnaire Art and Math Connection
Discussion: Art and Math 
Art History: Maurits Cornelis (MC) Escher (1898-1972) 
One of the world's most famous graphic artists. 
He was born in the Netherlands
Fourth and youngest son of a civil engineer. 
Failed his high school exams
He attended School for Architecture and Decorative Arts in Haarlem.
M.C. Escher 
Illustrated books
Designed tapestries
Postage stamps
Murals
Created 448 lithographs, woodcuts & wood engravings 
Over 2000 drawings and sketches. 
M.C. Escher was left-handed like Michelangelo &  Leonardo da Vinci

Key Vocabulary: A tessellation is created when a shape is repeated over and over again covering a plane without any gaps or overlaps.
"tessellate" means to arrange small squares in a checkered or mosaic pattern. 
The word "tessellate" is derived from the Greek word "tesseres," which in English means “four."
Regular Tessellation: made up of congruent regular polygons. 

Regular means that the sides and angles of the polygon are all equivalent: EQUAL. 
a tessellation of triangles       
a tessellation of squares
a tessellation of hexagons
Escher elaborated patterns by distorting the basic shapes to render them into animals, birds, and other figures. 

These distortions had to obey the three, four, or six-fold symmetry of the underlying pattern in order to preserve the tessellation.
Irregular tessellations: all other tessellations, including the tiling in the main image.

Teacher Models 
Examples of vocabulary on the board throughout discussion 
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors room throughout discussion
Step by Step modeling on how to create tessellations: 
Project Steps: “Translation” pattern - where you attach the cut out pieces to an   opposite side of your shape:
After you sketched the shape - cut out the pieces. 
Do not throw away any cutouts!
They should be attached to the opposite sides.
Slide down the top piece and tape it to the bottom side of the square.
Slide the left cutout to the right side of the square and tape it.
Trace your tessellation onto a drawing paper:
Add Details
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion ensure comprehension and active note taking 
Various Activities Designed to check/enhance student comprehension
Activity:  Remaining studio time day 1 and day 2
Sketchbook Drawing: Students will begin thinking about their ideas for tessellations  in their sketchbooks. 

FINAL PROJECT: Students will have 4 studio days to complete Tessellations
Project Requirements
Sketchbook: 
Student will practice using the 4” square format
Student will construct design ideas in sketchbook
Student will complete design ideas by creating a person, animal or 
                            creature
Student will practice shading techniques
Originality: Student will work at making each mammal slightly different
Final Project 
Student created a full page of tessellations
Student used the 4” square format
Final tessellation creates a person, animal or creature
Each tessellation is completed with detail and accuracy 
Student used multiple shading techniques to complete

Student used time wisely and displayed full effort in final project results. 

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Blind Contour Still Life



INTRODUCTION to lesson (Anticipatory set): 

"I hate flowers -- I paint them because they're cheaper than models and they don't move."- Georgia O'Keeffe. 

Students will: Think-Pair-Share
Independently read the Quote
Discuss the quote with group members
Independently write down their own response
Share written responses with group members
Participate in this class discussion 

OBJECTIVE: Draw and shade a large still life using Blind Contour Drawing as the tool.  Students will finish the blind contour drawing using shading techniques they have studied previously.
Draw their hands for pre-assessment
Discuss art history, Blind Contour, shading techniques
Practice drawing still life several times
Students will be able comprehend and use these terms in relation to drawing 
Hatching Blind Contour Stippling Tint
Crosshatching Contour line Scumbling Contour hatching
Shade Light Source Still Life Modified BCD

CA STANDARDS: 
1.2 Discuss a series of their original works of art, using the appropriate vocabulary of art.
2.1 Create original works of art of increasing complexity and skill in a variety of media that reflect their feelings and points of view
4.1 Describe the relationship involving the art maker (artist), the making (process), the artwork (product), and the viewer.
5.3 Prepare portfolios of their original works of art for a variety of purposes (e.g., review for post secondary application, exhibition, job application, and personal collection)
PURPOSE: Drawing in the Blind Contour drawing technique become more valuable when students understand the rules and see a finished product

INSTRUCTION: 
Students will be introduced to the artists Andy Warhol and Barry Flanagan and their line drawing studies. These works will allow students to comprehend using blind contour and a simplifying a still life from objects to shapes. 


MATERIALS: Sketch Books Drawing Pencils
Copy Paper 12x18 white paper or card stock
DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Day 1: Power Point Presentation
Opening: In sketch Books, Art Quote O’Keeffe activity
Review Girl upside down and directions
Draw hand in two minute timed blind contour drawing 
Model or show video of Blind Contour 
Art History: Andy Warhol and Barry Flanagan
HOLDING YOUR PENCIL
Try each hold in sketch book
Shading Techniques
Draw still life in two minute timed drawing for the remainder of class
CLOSURE: How do you feel about the Still life Drawing? Write brief 
Notes on thoughts in sketch book. 
Teacher Models: 
Blind Contour Drawing of hand
Each Shading Technique 
Check for Understanding: 
Check Blind Contour hands by walking around the room
Check Blind Contour Still life by walking around the room
Day 2: Studio class
Opening: "The best artists know what to leave out."- Charles de 
Lint,
Review Power point on Blind Contour rules
Review holding your pencil
ASSIGN FINAL ART PROJECT: 
Draw still life on large paper
Fill the page with balanced composition
Find details of each object using line
Find Light source of each object and identify the lightest
And darkest point of each
Shade each object in still life 
Students receive large Paper and begin their BCD of Still life
Students complete drawings by finding all the details in the still
Life using line. 
CLOSURE: write brief summary of studio class in journal
Like/dislike/rules/etc.
Day 3: Studio Class
Opening: Art Link: Draw five circles and try each shading technique 
From one light source
Review Shading Techniques
Students begin to finish each still life object using each shading
Technique at least once in the composition
CLOSURE: How do you feel about your work to date? 
Day 4: Studio Class: Work on Final assignment
Opening: ART LINK: Don’t think about making art just get it done. 
Let everyone else decide if it’s good or bad, whether they 
Love it or hate it. While they are deciding , make more art. 
Students continue work on final art project

Day 5: Studio Class: work on Final Assignment and CRITIQUE
Opening: In sketch books, Draw Your Hand using BCD
and shade one finger 5 Minute activity
Students complete final project first 30 minutes
Students participate in Critique last 25 minutes of class.