Sunday, January 24, 2016

Tessellation Pattern Project




Lesson Objective
Work with elements of art: Line, shape
Work with Principles of Art: Pattern 
Draw connections between Art and Math to increase Engagement.  

Key Vocabulary: A tessellation is created when a shape is repeated over and over again covering a plane without any gaps or overlaps.
"tessellate" means to arrange small squares in a checkered or mosaic pattern. 
The word "tessellate" is derived from the Greek word "tesseres," which in English means “four."
Regular Tessellation: made up of congruent regular polygons. 
Regular means that the sides and angles of the polygon are all equivalent: EQUAL.

Materials: 
12x 12 Tag Board 
Pencil
4”x4” template 
Scissors 

Focus Artist/s: MC Escher

Project Requirements
Create a repeated Tessellation pattern. Complete the pattern with a changing mammal 
Assessment: 
Informal: Sketchbook studies
Formal: Oral Self Critique
Formal: Artist Statement
Formal: Grading final sculpture

CA STANDARDS: 
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
Impact of Media Choice
1.5 Analyze the material used by a given artist and describe how its use influences the meaning of the work.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
2.2 Prepare a portfolio of original two-and three-dimensional works of art that reflects refined craftsmanship and technical skills.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.4 Demonstrate an understanding of the various skills of an artist, art critic, and philosopher of art (aesthetician).

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques, group activities to check for understanding
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 
Advanced art students will be asked to increase the difficulty of their final tessellation They will also be expected incorporate more details and art principles into the final project

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit  shape from the earlier learning for cubism. We will use similar visuals to refresh earlier learning.  Notes on Art history, Key Vocabulary and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final project.  will be demo step by step instruction in class using guided instruction. 

Anticipatory Set: Art Link: 
Art Link: Are Math and Art Related? 
Complete Handout and turn it in for sketchbook grade. 
Pre-assessment  form
Students fill out pre-assessment on their own
Large Group Activity
Address pre-assessment questions as a large group to assess prior knowledge
Large Group Discussion on Art and Math 

OBJECTIVE: Introduce the concept of Art and Math Connection through the artwork of M.C. Escher. Allow students to solve the visual arts problem of creating a Repeating pattern using the tessellation format. 

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Power Point Presentation Tessellations
Pre-assessment: Questionnaire Art and Math Connection
Discussion: Art and Math 
Art History: Maurits Cornelis (MC) Escher (1898-1972) 
One of the world's most famous graphic artists. 
He was born in the Netherlands
Fourth and youngest son of a civil engineer. 
Failed his high school exams
He attended School for Architecture and Decorative Arts in Haarlem.
M.C. Escher 
Illustrated books
Designed tapestries
Postage stamps
Murals
Created 448 lithographs, woodcuts & wood engravings 
Over 2000 drawings and sketches. 
M.C. Escher was left-handed like Michelangelo &  Leonardo da Vinci

Key Vocabulary: A tessellation is created when a shape is repeated over and over again covering a plane without any gaps or overlaps.
"tessellate" means to arrange small squares in a checkered or mosaic pattern. 
The word "tessellate" is derived from the Greek word "tesseres," which in English means “four."
Regular Tessellation: made up of congruent regular polygons. 

Regular means that the sides and angles of the polygon are all equivalent: EQUAL. 
a tessellation of triangles       
a tessellation of squares
a tessellation of hexagons
Escher elaborated patterns by distorting the basic shapes to render them into animals, birds, and other figures. 

These distortions had to obey the three, four, or six-fold symmetry of the underlying pattern in order to preserve the tessellation.
Irregular tessellations: all other tessellations, including the tiling in the main image.

Teacher Models 
Examples of vocabulary on the board throughout discussion 
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors room throughout discussion
Step by Step modeling on how to create tessellations: 
Project Steps: “Translation” pattern - where you attach the cut out pieces to an   opposite side of your shape:
After you sketched the shape - cut out the pieces. 
Do not throw away any cutouts!
They should be attached to the opposite sides.
Slide down the top piece and tape it to the bottom side of the square.
Slide the left cutout to the right side of the square and tape it.
Trace your tessellation onto a drawing paper:
Add Details
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion ensure comprehension and active note taking 
Various Activities Designed to check/enhance student comprehension
Activity:  Remaining studio time day 1 and day 2
Sketchbook Drawing: Students will begin thinking about their ideas for tessellations  in their sketchbooks. 

FINAL PROJECT: Students will have 4 studio days to complete Tessellations
Project Requirements
Sketchbook: 
Student will practice using the 4” square format
Student will construct design ideas in sketchbook
Student will complete design ideas by creating a person, animal or 
                            creature
Student will practice shading techniques
Originality: Student will work at making each mammal slightly different
Final Project 
Student created a full page of tessellations
Student used the 4” square format
Final tessellation creates a person, animal or creature
Each tessellation is completed with detail and accuracy 
Student used multiple shading techniques to complete

Student used time wisely and displayed full effort in final project results. 

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Blind Contour Still Life



INTRODUCTION to lesson (Anticipatory set): 

"I hate flowers -- I paint them because they're cheaper than models and they don't move."- Georgia O'Keeffe. 

Students will: Think-Pair-Share
Independently read the Quote
Discuss the quote with group members
Independently write down their own response
Share written responses with group members
Participate in this class discussion 

OBJECTIVE: Draw and shade a large still life using Blind Contour Drawing as the tool.  Students will finish the blind contour drawing using shading techniques they have studied previously.
Draw their hands for pre-assessment
Discuss art history, Blind Contour, shading techniques
Practice drawing still life several times
Students will be able comprehend and use these terms in relation to drawing 
Hatching Blind Contour Stippling Tint
Crosshatching Contour line Scumbling Contour hatching
Shade Light Source Still Life Modified BCD

CA STANDARDS: 
1.2 Discuss a series of their original works of art, using the appropriate vocabulary of art.
2.1 Create original works of art of increasing complexity and skill in a variety of media that reflect their feelings and points of view
4.1 Describe the relationship involving the art maker (artist), the making (process), the artwork (product), and the viewer.
5.3 Prepare portfolios of their original works of art for a variety of purposes (e.g., review for post secondary application, exhibition, job application, and personal collection)
PURPOSE: Drawing in the Blind Contour drawing technique become more valuable when students understand the rules and see a finished product

INSTRUCTION: 
Students will be introduced to the artists Andy Warhol and Barry Flanagan and their line drawing studies. These works will allow students to comprehend using blind contour and a simplifying a still life from objects to shapes. 


MATERIALS: Sketch Books Drawing Pencils
Copy Paper 12x18 white paper or card stock
DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Day 1: Power Point Presentation
Opening: In sketch Books, Art Quote O’Keeffe activity
Review Girl upside down and directions
Draw hand in two minute timed blind contour drawing 
Model or show video of Blind Contour 
Art History: Andy Warhol and Barry Flanagan
HOLDING YOUR PENCIL
Try each hold in sketch book
Shading Techniques
Draw still life in two minute timed drawing for the remainder of class
CLOSURE: How do you feel about the Still life Drawing? Write brief 
Notes on thoughts in sketch book. 
Teacher Models: 
Blind Contour Drawing of hand
Each Shading Technique 
Check for Understanding: 
Check Blind Contour hands by walking around the room
Check Blind Contour Still life by walking around the room
Day 2: Studio class
Opening: "The best artists know what to leave out."- Charles de 
Lint,
Review Power point on Blind Contour rules
Review holding your pencil
ASSIGN FINAL ART PROJECT: 
Draw still life on large paper
Fill the page with balanced composition
Find details of each object using line
Find Light source of each object and identify the lightest
And darkest point of each
Shade each object in still life 
Students receive large Paper and begin their BCD of Still life
Students complete drawings by finding all the details in the still
Life using line. 
CLOSURE: write brief summary of studio class in journal
Like/dislike/rules/etc.
Day 3: Studio Class
Opening: Art Link: Draw five circles and try each shading technique 
From one light source
Review Shading Techniques
Students begin to finish each still life object using each shading
Technique at least once in the composition
CLOSURE: How do you feel about your work to date? 
Day 4: Studio Class: Work on Final assignment
Opening: ART LINK: Don’t think about making art just get it done. 
Let everyone else decide if it’s good or bad, whether they 
Love it or hate it. While they are deciding , make more art. 
Students continue work on final art project

Day 5: Studio Class: work on Final Assignment and CRITIQUE
Opening: In sketch books, Draw Your Hand using BCD
and shade one finger 5 Minute activity
Students complete final project first 30 minutes
Students participate in Critique last 25 minutes of class. 













Oval Figure Drawing



INTRODUCTION to lesson (Anticipatory set): Students will choose a quote by an artist below:
Francisco Goya: When I work, I work very fast, but preparing to work can take any length of time.
Alberto Giacometti: My contribution to the world is my ability to draw. I will draw as much as I can for as many people as I can for as long as I can. Drawing is still basically the same as it has been since prehistoric times. It brings together man and the world. It lives through magic.
Vincent Van Gogh: The emotions are sometimes so strong that I work without knowing it. The strokes come like speech.
Students will: independently read the power point slide
Discuss the quotes with group members
Independently write down their own response
Share written responses with group members
Participate in this class discussion 

OBJECTIVE: Create a figure drawing showing movement using gestural drawing techniques with correct proportion based on rules learned
Students will be able to: 
Draw Oval Action Figures
Draw Gestural Figures
Draw with correct Proportion
Learn to draw movement
Draw with models
Students will be able comprehend and use these terms in relation to drawing 
Figures: 
Movement Proportion Central Axis Line Line of Force
Oval Action Gestural drawing

CA STANDARDS: (addressed in detail page one) 
2.1 Solve Visual art standard w/effective use of art elements
2.4 Review and Refine observational drawing skills
4.5 Employ art critiques in writing and speaking about works of art

PURPOSE: Drawing the figure becomes more achievable when students have rules and actions to follow. 

INSTRUCTION: 
Students will be introduced to the artist Pablo Picasso and his line drawing studies. These works will allow students to comprehend simplifying the figure to shape and line. 


MATERIALS: Sketch Books Pencils with eraser
Copy Paper Large copy paper or card stock
DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Day 1: Power Point Presentation
Opening: In sketch Books, Art Quote activity
Review of Blind Contour drawings STILL LIFE 
***Video Link on slide***
Pablo Picasso
Contour Line
HOLDING YOUR PENCIL
Try each hold in sketch book
Figure proportion
First pose and drawing
CLOSURE: Ask students to spend the last moments of class
discussing the process with their table
In sketch book write what you like/dislike about oval action drawing
Teacher Models: 
Each Proportion while discussing (PPP ends slide 18)
First Pose for group in prep for day 2
Check for Understanding: 
Check first pose in sketch book by walking around the room
See that students have taken accurate notes
Give handout 
Day 2: Studio class
Opening: In sketch books, Draw what is written activity 
(PPP slide 19)
Review Power point on proportions
Review holding your pencil
Review WHY: grab essence of moving object quickly 
Students each have one turn posing
Poses go from one minute to 45 seconds to 30 seconds
If time allows, students could pair up and continue to draw 30
Second poses
CLOSURE: write brief summary of studio class in journal
Like/dislike/rules/etc.
Day 3: Gestural Drawing
Opening: In Sketch books: Draw what you see activity
(PPP slide 20)
Review Oval Action (PPP Slide 21-24)
Watch Video on gestural drawing
Discuss Line of force
Discuss Central axis Line 
Students Pair up and attempt this new type of drawing

CLOSURE: Assign Final Art Project
Gestural Drawing Series Assignment: 
Large Paper
5-7 poses
Could tell story/ Can also be random series
DO NOT ERASE GESTURAL LINES
Finish each in some way: 
INK Shading
Color Pencils Stippling 
Day 4: Studio Class: work on Final assignment
Opening: (PPP slide 20)
Students begin work on final art project

Day 5: Studio Class: work on Final Assignment and CRITIQUE
Opening: Review/Revisit: Vincent Van Gogh: The emotions are sometimes so strong that I work without knowing it. The strokes come like speech.
Students complete final project 30 minutes
Students participate in Critique last 25 minutes of class. 









Sunday, June 7, 2015

Dinner Plate Final



Lesson Objective: Create 3-D artwork in Clay from Famous 2-D artwork explore and review cumulative learning of additive, subtractive construction and the elements and principles of art.
Project Requirements: 
Sketchbook: Complete a plan of the final plate, with famous artwork  in your sketchbook including:
Plan for addition and subtraction of clay
      Update the work for contemporary day
Details with Measurements for final construction
Full Color Study with approval to move to final project
Final Art work:  
      Create a uniform dinner plate, with a famous artwork, in clay
Must have addition and subtraction
Must consider line, shape, value, color, texture, balance, unity & movement 
Update the work to represent contemporary day
      Glaze is applied with detail and precision
Presentation: 
Famous Artist Information
Birth/Death
School
Art Movement Association
Major Exhibitions
Lasting Value of the work
Interesting information
Quote 

Final meets California Art Standards: 

1.8 Analyze the works of a well-known artist as to the art media selected and the effect of that selection on the artist's style.
2.1 Create original works of art of increasing complexity and skill in a variety of media that reflect their feelings and points of view.
2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual.
2.4 Demonstrate in their own works of art a personal style and an advanced proficiency in communicating an idea, theme, or emotion.
2.6 Present a universal concept in a multimedia work of art that demonstrates knowledge of technology skills.
3.2 Identify contemporary artists worldwide who have achieved regional, national, or international recognition and discuss ways in which their work reflects, plays a role in, and influences present-day culture. (artist statement question)
4.1 Describe the relationship involving the art maker (artist), the making (process), the artwork (product), and the viewer.
4.3 Analyze and articulate how society influences the interpretation and message of a work of art.
5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the symbols and images.

Assessment: 
Informal: Small group written critique
Formal: Artist Statement
Formal: Grading final sculpture

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques, group activities to check for understanding
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 
Advanced art students will be asked to increase the difficulty of their final sculpture They will also be expected incorporate more details and principles into the final project

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit Contrast, Color, Pattern, Scale, Proportion, Movement, Rhythm  from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh earlier learning.  Notes on Art history, Key Vocabulary and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final sculpture will be demo started in class using guided instruction.

Key Vocabulary: Feminist Art, 

Materials
Clay
Clay Tools
Slip
Glaze

Direct Instruction
Critique:
Small Group: Judy Chicago’s Plate
Large Group: Judy Chicago’s Plate

Judy Chicago (1939-       )
Born Judith Sylvia Cohen in Chicago, Illinois
American feminist artist, art educator
Received her Master of Fine Arts from UCLA in 1964.
Known for her large collaborative art installation pieces which examine the role of women in history and culture. 
By the 1970s, Chicago had coined the term "feminist art" 
She founded the first feminist art program in the United States. 
In 1970 full-time teacher at Fresno State College
Teaching women the skills needed to express the female perspective in their work.
She planned a class that would consist only of women
She would teach students off campus to escape "the presence and the expectations of men.”
It was at this time when Chicago would coin the term "feminist art"[
Chicago's work incorporates stereotypical women's artistic skills, such as needlework, counterbalanced with stereotypical male skills such as welding and pyrotechnics. 
Chicago's masterpiece is The Dinner Party, which is in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum.

Dinner Party
First epic feminist artwork
Symbolic history of women in Western civilization. 
39 place settings for mythical and historical famous women
Arranged along a triangular table
Each unique place-setting includes:
A hand-painted china plate, 
Ceramic flatware and chalice
Napkin with an embroidered gold edge. 
Plate, brightly-colored, elaborately styled form. 
Settings are on embroidered runners, with various needlework styles. 








Tunnel Book Final

Lesson Objective: Create a 3-D work of art from a famous 2-D work of Art  reflecting both your personal style and the style of the researched artist. 

Project requirements
Sketchbook: Complete a plan of the final work in your sketchbook including:
Plan for Foreground, Middle grounds and Back ground
Update the work to contemporary day
Details with Measurements for final construction of Tunnel book
Full Color Study with approval to move to final project
Final Art work: 
Maximum: 12x12      Minimum: 6x6
1 Foreground (Min)
3 middle grounds (Min)
1 Background (Min)
Full color in any medium
Must be able to see the full artwork from front
Update the work to contemporary day
Accordion to hold four Grounds
Book Structure including: Cover, Inside, Tunnel, and back cover
Cover of the book
Typography (Handwritten)
Artist’s Name
Title of the work
Decoration Relating to the artwork (pattern, etc)
Inside Cover
Famous Artist Information
Birth/Death
School
Art Movement Association
Major Exhibitions
Lasting Value of the work
Interesting information
Quote 
Back Cover
Must have Artist Statement (1 page) typed and on the back of the book jacket
Full Name
School/Grade
Motivation for choosing art/artist
Process of creating book
Interesting information (set backs, etc.)
What you learned from the experience
Your favorite Art Quote
Final Presentation: Must present final pop-up book to class (4-6 Minute Presention)
Cover: Discuss Typography
Art history about chosen artist (inside Cover)
Why did you pick this artwork
How did you transform the piece from 2-D to 3-D
How did you update the work to make it contemporary 
Artist Statement (back Cover)

   

Final meets California Art Standards: 

1.8 Analyze the works of a well-known artist as to the art media selected and the effect of that selection on the artist's style.
2.1 Create original works of art of increasing complexity and skill in a variety of media that reflect their feelings and points of view.
2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual.
2.4 Demonstrate in their own works of art a personal style and an advanced proficiency in communicating an idea, theme, or emotion.
2.6 Present a universal concept in a multimedia work of art that demonstrates knowledge of technology skills.
3.2 Identify contemporary artists worldwide who have achieved regional, national, or international recognition and discuss ways in which their work reflects, plays a role in, and influences present-day culture. (artist statement question)
4.1 Describe the relationship involving the art maker (artist), the making (process), the artwork (product), and the viewer.
4.3 Analyze and articulate how society influences the interpretation and message of a work of art.
5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the symbols and images.

Assessment: 
Informal: Small group written critique
Formal: Artist Statement
Formal: Grading final sculpture

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques, group activities to check for understanding
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 
Advanced art students will be asked to increase the difficulty of their final sculpture They will also be expected incorporate more details and principles into the final project

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit Contrast, Color, Pattern, Scale, Proportion, Movement, Rhythm  from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh earlier learning.  Notes on Art history, Key Vocabulary and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final sculpture will be demo started in class using guided instruction.

Key Vocabulary: Typography, Accordion, Foreground, Middle Ground, Back Ground

Materials: 
Tag Board Or heavy Card Stock
Paint
Oil Pastel
Sharpies
Watercolor
Glue
Cardboard

Direct Instruction: 
Art Link: Project a photo of a completed tunnel book to the class
Critique this tunnel book with small group
Critique Tunnel book as large group.

Art History: 
A tunnel or peephole book is a set of pages bound into accordions on two sides 
It is viewed through a central opening.
Scenery or shapes are cut out of the pages and then assembled in layers.
 Inspired by theatrical stage sets
The tunnel book form dates from the mid-eighteenth century 
Project additional examples and model how to create the final book through example and step by step instruction




Reflection: Students who were the most successful created mattes that got smaller in size leading to background. This format increased stability, reflected art history and met more rubric goals. Here is the link to the historic photo we referenced to increase comprehension: http://library.si.edu/digital-library/exhibition/paper-engineering/dance-tunnel-book