Monday, September 2, 2013

Wire Sculpture with Alexander Calder


Art Link: 
What is Form
Compare and contrast Form to art we have created in the classroom

INTRODUCTION to lesson (Anticipatory set): 
Analyze the pillow artwork by Mathilde Roussel
Use Critique/discussion form to enhance conversation
Think-Pair-Share 
Group discussion about this work of art

OBJECTIVE: Using uncut Wire, create a piece of art inspired by Alexander Calder. Include Form Space and balance in the final work of art. 
Discuss with table form and space as pre-assessment
Discuss and practice drawing your final project on paper
Work closely with teacher before receiving wire
Students will understand new vocabulary as is relates to visual art: 
Form Space Balance Relief Sculpture 
Mobiles High Relief Middle Relief Ladder perspective
Low Relief Space shapes Free-standing sculpture
Linear perspective Mobile Kinetic Stabiles

CA STANDARDS: 
1.1 Identify and use the principles of design to discuss, analyze, and write about visual aspects in the environment and in works of art, including their own.
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual. 
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the symbols and images.

PURPOSE: complete a wire sculptue addressing elements and principles of art

INSTRUCTION: 
Students will discover review the elements of art, explore, form, space and balance, look at the artwork of Alexander Calder and create a wire sculpture piece as a final art project. 

MATERIALS: four feet of wire per student
Sketch paper
Pencils

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Power Point Presentation FORM
Pre-assessment: Sketchbook: 
How does this art effect you? 
Opening: Art Link: What is Form activity
Review: Elements of art 
Discussion: Form, Space, Balance
Space: Overlapping
Ladder perspective
Linear perspective
Form and Sculpture
Relief Sculpture
Free Standing Sculpture 
Space and sculpture
Review Principles of Art
Balance
Symmetry
Asymmetry
ART HISTORY: ALEXANDER CALDER
Expressionist
Began with wire circus
Invented Mobile
VIDEO: Calder’s Circus
Wire sculptures
Describe, Interpret, Analyze
Calder had plans in his sketchbook
Teacher Models: 
Form, Space and Balance throughout discussion 
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors throughout discussion
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion to be sure notes are being taken 

FINAL PROJECT: Students will create a wire sculpture in the style of Alexander Calder
Sculptures must be in the shape of a box and have objects inside
Wire may not be cut, students will solve the problem of the wire in its 
full length
Students will draw and submit three plans for their wire before receiving 
Wire. They must consider measurements, interior content Form,   Space and Balance. 





Op Art Wire sculptures



Art Link: 
What an Optical Illusion
How do artists create illusions in their work
Name three ways we have used illusions in our artwork

INTRODUCTION to lesson (Anticipatory set): 
How does this art effect you? 

OBJECTIVE: Create wire sculpture from found objects, finished in two colors to give the illusion of visual movement. 
Students will understand new vocabulary as is relates to visual art: 
Op Art Kinetic Optical Illusion Chromatic Achromatic
Negative Space Positive Space Complementary
Neutral Contrast Value Hue
Saturation

CA STANDARDS: 
1.3 Research and analyze the work of an artist and write about the artist's distinctive style and its contribution to the meaning of the work.
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.2 Compare the ways in which the meaning of a specific work of art has been affected over time because of changes in interpretation and context.
5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the symbols and images.
5.3 Prepare portfolios of their original works of art for a variety of purposes (e.g., review for post secondary application, exhibition, job application, and personal collection).

PURPOSE: complete a wire sculpture with contrast that creates the illusion of movement

INSTRUCTION: 
Students will receive details about Op Art
Students will aid in instruction by researching one of nine artists and sharing the information with the class. 

MATERIALS: 
Wire Hangers
Wood block
Nylon sock
Acrylic paint
brushes

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Day 1: Power Point Presentation Op Art
Opening: Art Link: What is an Optical Illusion
Pre-assessment: Sketchbook: 
How does this art effect you? 
Review: Describe, analyze, interpret
Discussion: Op Art
History
Impact on culture
Objective of Op Art
Requirements to be considered Op art
ART HISTORY: Indirect Instruction
Each table will receive research paper on one of nine artists
Students will read, collect data and present one artist to the class as a
Group
Students will take notes in their sketchbook about each of the nine artists
MC Esher
Julian Stanczak
Josef Albers
Yaacov Agam
Jesus-Rafael Soto
Richard Anuszkiewicz
Bridget Riley
Frank Stlla
Victor Vasarely
Teacher Models: 
Optical illusion and art History
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors throughout discussion
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion to be sure notes are being taken 
Presentation assessment
FINAL PROJECT: Students will create a wire sculpture using op art style
Sculptures must be made from supplies received
Students will use two contrasting colors to achieve optical movement

Day 2: Color theory
Art Link: Prep for presentations
Student artist Presentations
Day 3:
Art Link: 
Favorite artist studied from day 2
Discussion:
Complete presentations
Rubric
Studio: Begin to construct sculptures
              Wire hanger into wood block
Day 4: Color Theory
Art Link: Compare and contrast Vasarely’s two works of art
One black and white, one in color. 
Studio: Artists construct their three piece wire sculpture. 
               Paint it with a glue mixture
                     1/3 Elmers glue 2/3 water
Discussion: 
Color Theory with Josef Albers
Day 5: Black and white study
Art Link: 
Studio: artists paint sculpture with glue mixture
Draw sculpture in sketchbook to study
Fill in sculpture study with black and white pattern
Day 6: Color study
Art Link
Studio: artists paint sculpture with glue mixture
Draw sculpture in sketchbook to study
Fill in sculpture study with a two color pattern
              Paint with acrylic paint
                 no blue tape allowed
MATERIALS: 
   Wood blocks (all shapes) two drilled holes that will hold wire hanger
   Wire hanger
   Glue 
   Water
   Paint brushes (small brushes for details)









Sunday, January 13, 2013

Value hands with KAWS


 

DISCUSSION: 
Talk about The Kaws painting below:
              What is happening in the piece
What type of art does it most remind you of?
Look at the second piece
Have you seen this before? When? 
What is the same about the two pieces of art? 
color and mood how does it make you feel? 
Value: tints and shades
Black: You only need a dot to change the color
Monochromatic mono (one) chrome (color)
Pure color: color from the bottle. 
ARTIST: Kaws
KAWS (1974-)
American Painter and illustrator
was born Brian Donnelly in Jersey City, New Jersey.[1] 
He graduated from the School of Visual Arts in New York with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in illustration in 1996.[2] 
After graduation, KAWS briefly worked for Disney as a freelance animator painting backgrounds. 
He also contributed to the animated series 101 Dalmatians, Daria and Doug.[3]

PROJECT: 
Step 1: On card stock, trace your hand. Make sure you finger tips are at the top of the paper and draw your wrist/arm till the bottom. 
Step 2: Draw four horizontal lines through the paper making five stripes (1 is the stripe with fingertip 5 is the bottom stripe with the wrist) seven spaced apart
Step 3: Add pure color through the middle both in and outside of the hand drawing
Step4: Paint white on the inside of the fingertips and opposite end the outside of the wrist
Step5: Mix white with red 
Step6: Add the new color inside the hand (2nd Stripe) and outside the wrist (fourth Stripe)
Step7: Paint black on the inside of the wrist (5) and the outside of the fingertips (1) 
Step6: Add black to your pure color
Step7: Add your new color inside wrist (4) outside the hand (2) 

MATERIALS:
card stock
Tempura Paint in white Black and red
Scrap paper











Saturday, January 12, 2013

Negative and positive Space with Mathilda Roussel



Discussion
Positive space and Negative
What is positive space? 
When we cut something out positive is the object
Negative is the hole
In a sculpture positive space is the materials
Negative space is the holes in and around the work
Space is also the distance between points and planes in an artwork

What do you think of this piece? 
What is positive
What is negative
What is the work made from? 

ARTIST: Mathilde Roussel (Ma-tit   Rou-sel) 
French artist based in Paris. 
Her work is a sensible and symbolic research about the nature of physical life. 
She is interested in the cyclic metamorphoses that transform organic matter, whether vegetable, animal or human. 
Roussel interrogates the ways in which time weighs on our body, leaving its traces as an imprint and thus creating an invisible archive of our emotions, a mute history of our existence. 
She uses a diversity of materials from paper to fabric, from rubber to graphite. 
Her ephemeral sculptures she uses organic matter such as wheat grass, pollen, sap or milk. Her work becomes a mapping of the body, an anatomy of the time and space inhabited by our fragile presence in the world.

PROJECT: 
Step1: Fill your paper with different colored tissue paper. Glue them down
Layer and overlap to show change in color
Step2: Using a second paper cut out a shape, any shape and throw the shape away
Keep the hole
Step3: Layer the hole on top of the paper with the tissue. Glue it top top
Step4: crop the sides if needed. 

MATERIALS
Tissue
Two pieces of card stock the same size
Scissors
Glue













Monday, January 7, 2013

Tint Wire Sculptures with Elizabeth Murray




Day One: 

Prep: Create a 24” in wire circle for each student in class: Easier to work with, prevents eye pokes. 













DISCUSSION: 
Form: What is form? 
What is sculpture? 
How is sculpture different from a painting? 
3d vs 2d
Show Elizabeth Murray’s work again
How is it like s sculpture?
How is it like a painting? 

ARTIST: Elizabeth Murray (1940-2007):
Inspired by Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock’s work, as well as Pablo Picasso’s Cubist works, American painter Elizabeth Murray’s oeuvre span styles from a Minimalist use form and color to bold, cartoonish Surrealism
Her works push the boundaries of a two-dimensional medium;
The irregular triangles in the “Giant Maiden” series (1972) strain against the edges of canvases painted in high relief, 
While the explosive colors on an intricate collage-like canvas in Do the Dance (2005) lend the Painting a kinetic, almost optical quality.

Project: 
Step1: Using your wire circle, create an organic shape

Step2: Using plaster strips, cover wire with plaster
Step3: To Identify: put your name on the paper plate your wire sculpture is sitting on to dry. 


Materials: 
Bowl for water
Paper plates
Wire 

Day two


 Discussion: impressionism
Value
Making colors lighter
White
Light

Art Movement: impressionism
Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement 
originated with a group of Paris-based artists. 
Their independent exhibitions brought them to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s, 
Harsh opposition from the conventional art community in France. 
The name of the style derives from the title of a Claude Monet work, Impression, soleil levant (Impression, Sunrise)
Impressionist painting characteristics include relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), common, ordinary subject matter, 
inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles. 
The development of Impressionism in the visual arts was soon followed by analogous styles in other media that became known as impressionist music and impressionist literature.
For additional information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impressionism 

PROJECT
Step1: students  receive one pure color and white
Step2: mix their color with as much or little white as they like
Step3: paint the wire sculpture with their new color
Step4: add movement lines in black around the edges




Materials: 
Paint in many colors and white
Black paint
Paint brushes
Water containers
Paper plates for palettes. 

Post Project Week one and two: create the large sculpture by glueing the smaller works all together. I used Loctite All purpose Adhesive Caulk in Clear. 



Sunday, December 9, 2012

Pattern POP trees with Andy Warhol





Discussion: Pattern, Stripes and stars
To have a pattern with stripes, they must repeat. 
Where do we find stripes? what animals have stripes?
Do tree’s have stripes? where are they?
Horizontal, this word means side to side or across. 

Show Warhol’s Tiiffany and Co work of the stripes tree with stars
What do you think of this piece?
Does it remind you of anything?
Where do we find stars?

look at this print of Warhol's:
http://www.bandagedear.com/featured-product/christmas-tree-ca-1950-1955-multi-by-andy-warhol

Andy Warhol
(August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987), 
Born Andrew Warhola 
An American painter, printmaker, and filmmaker 
leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art
After a successful career as a commercial illustrator
During this time he created holiday prints for Tiffany's
Warhol became famous worldwide for his work as a painter
He was also filmmaker, record producer, author, 
Warhol has been the subject of numerous retrospective exhibitions, books, and feature and documentary films.
He coined the widely used expression "15 minutes of fame." 
The Andy Warhol Museum exists in memory of his life and artwork.
The highest price ever paid for a Warhol painting is $100 million for a 1963 canvas titled Eight Elvises. 
Died during routine gallbladder surgery in 1987

PROJECT: Create tree with wrapping paper
Step1: using your Wrapping paper scrapes, add largest part of tree first 
Step 2: Using another wrapping paper scrap, slightly smaller, add it above the first
Step3: Using another wrapping paper scrap, slightly smaller, add it above the last
step 4; Using another wrapping paper scrap, slightly smaller, add it above the last
Step5: Repeat with the smallest on top
Step6: add a star to The top

MATERIALS: 
Wrapping paper in all patterns
Glue stick
stars







Saturday, December 8, 2012

Collaboration: Mixed Movement Dot Circles with Sonya Delaunay, Elizabeth Murray and Seurat

THREE WEEK COLLABORATION PROJECT


Final Project at the end of third class 
WEEK 1

Discussion: 
Primary Color
Secondary color
Mixing colors to make new colors
Show a piece of Delaunay's artwork
Discuss color and shape

Artist:

Sonia Delaunay
(November 14, 1885December 5, 1979
Jewish-French artist 
Married to  Robert Delaunay 
Co-founded the Orphism art movement: noted for its use of strong colors and geometric shapes. 
Her work extends to painting, textile design and stage set design. 
She was the first living female artist to have a retrospective exhibition at the Louvre in 1964, and in 1975 was named an officer of the French Legion of Honor.
Her work in modern design included the concepts of geometric abstraction, the integration of furniture, fabrics, wall coverings, and clothing.




Project: Create mixed color circles for colloboraration canvas
Step1: Studenst mix two colors together in a small cup
Step2: studenst paint large circle on canvas

Materials: 
Tempura paint: primary secondary black and white
Paint brushes
30x40 canvas


WEEK 2

Discussion: Movement
Talk about movement and music in art work
Show Elizabeth Murray's work and ask if they see music
iPAD: Use the MOMA art app to add music to Murray's work and let studenst here the noises
No iPad: Study Keith Haring and talk about black movement lines

Artist: Elizabeth Murray (1940-2007):
Inspired by Abstract Expressionist Jackson Pollock’s work, as well as Pablo Picasso’s Cubist works 
American painter Elizabeth Murray’s oeuvre span styles from a Minimalist use form and color to bold, cartoonish Surrealism
Her works push the boundaries of a two-dimensional medium; the irregular triangles in the “Giant Maiden” series (1972) strain against the edges of canvases painted in high relief, while the explosive colors on an intricate collage-like canvas in Do the Dance (2005) lend the painting a kinetic, almost optical quality.



Project: using medium brushes have students add lines to circles
Step1: grab a brush with black paint and add one curved line 
step2: add a few straight lines

Materials: 
Black paint
Brushes
Circles canvas; see above. 

WEEK 3

Discussion: Dots
Mixing colors with your eye balls
Look at the Seurat work: Sunday on La Grande Jatte—1884
Ask students what they see (make sure they see the monkey) 
Have a close up of one spot on the final work that shows the dots. 
How does  the view mix the dots? Is this science? 

Artist: Georges Seurat 
(1859-1891)
French Painter
Invented pointillism
Took informal art lessons as a teen
Attended art school in Paris
He studied the relationship between lines and images and the effect light had on color
He wanted to know more about the emotional effect of color
He influenced science with his studies of colors



Project: add dots to the movement circles
Step1: using q-tips add put color dots to the final work

Materials
Tempura Paint
Q-tips