Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Rhythm Paper Mache




Lesson Objective 
Work with elements of art: Shape, Color
Work with principles of Art: Rhythm
Create a Rhythm Paper Mache Sculpture in the style of Sam Gilliam 

Key Vocabulary: 
  • Color Field: Bright Colors Presented in shape, large works that force the viewer the experience a field of color. 
  • Harlem Renaissance: A cultural and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem between the end of W W I and the middle of the 1930s and beyond.  
  • Rhythm: The reputation of movement like a beat in music or dance. 
  • Pattern: The regular repetition of an art element 
Materials: 
Cardboard
Foam Core
paint
glue
exacto knives
wheat paste
GESSO: 
Glue 1 part
Water 1/2 part
White Acrylic Gesso 1 part 

Focus Artist: 
Sam Gilliam

Project Requirements
Create Paper Mache Sculpture exploring pattern, music, and rhythm using color and shape to show Sam Gilliam’s influence.
Sketchbook: Students will pick a piece of music and draw black and white construction plans for each side of their Rhythm sculpture and submit plans for approval. 
Required: 
Cardboard and foam core sketchbook plan construction
Abstract shape and rhythm with Sam Gilliam’s influence apparent
Sketchbook: While sculptures are drying: students will add color and pattern to their     
                                    sketchbook designs. 
Required: 
Analogous colors and values present on final sculpture
Pattern present on all sides of the sculpture
Assessment: 
Informal: Large group Oral Critique
Formal: Artist Statement
Formal: Grading final sculpture

CA STANDARDS: 
1.1 Identify and use the principles of design to discuss, analyze, and write about visual aspects in the environment and in works of art, including their own. 
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.1 Articulate how personal beliefs, cultural traditions, and current social, economic, and political contexts influence the interpretation of the meaning or message in a work of art.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.2 Create a work of art that communicates a cross-cultural or universal theme taken from literature or history.

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques, group activities to check for understanding
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 
Advanced art students will be asked to increase the difficulty of their final sculpture They will also be expected incorporate more details and principles into the final project

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit Shape, Color, and Pattern from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh earlier learning.  Notes on Art history, Key Vocabulary and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final sculpture will be demo started in class using guided instruction. 

Art Link: 
Small Group Critique Sam Gilliam’s The petition 
Describe
Analyze
Interpret
Large Group Critique 
Reveal Sam Gilliam’s Thoughts on the work. 

INTRODUCTION: Sam Gilliam
Art History: Sam Gilliam, Color Field Art Movement, Harlem Renaissance and music in art. 

OBJECTIVE: Create Cardboard sculpture exploring color, shape, and rhythm in the style of Sam Gilliam
Cardboard and foam core Construction with Paper Mache
Must Complete Sculpture from all Angles in a 3 color palette exploring music/emotion
Critiques Sam Gilliam as pre-assessment
Discuss and practice drawing your final project on paper for construction and color. 
Work closely with teacher before moving through each step of the project
Students will understand new vocabulary as is relates to visual art

INSTRUCTION: 
Students will discover review the elements of Shape, color, and the principle Rhythm. They look at the artwork of Sam Gilliam and create a Paper Mache, Rhythm Sculpture exploring color and emotion. 

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Power Point Presentation Sam Gilliam, Color Field, Harlem Renaissance, Music, Color
Pre-assessment: Critique Sam Gilliam’s, The Petition
Opening: Art Link: Photo of Sam Gilliam’s, The Petition
Small Group Discussion
Describe the work
Analyze the artwork
Interpret The artwork 
Large Group Discussion
Discussion: Art History: Sam Gilliam, Color Field and Harlem Renaissance 
ART HISTORY: Sam Gilliam 
Sam Gilliam (1933-      ) 
Tupelo, MS, African American, Color Field Painter 
Associated with the Washington Color School 
Works also considered: Abstract Expressionism 
Works on stretched, draped and adds sculptural 3D elements. 
First artist to show painted canvas hanging without stretcher bars, 1965.
Views teaching art as a part of his mission.
In 1975, Gilliam was influenced by jazz musicians: Miles Davis and John Coltrane. 
He started producing dynamic geometric collages, which he called “Black Paintings" due to the hue.  
Watch Video
Color Field: 1950\
An offshoot of Cubism
Bright colors are presented in shapes
The works emphasize the flatness of the canvas because that is what a painting is literally about.
Subject: The tension set up between the colors and shapes. 
    • The shapes seem to both emerge and submerge into the colors.
    • These works are very large, the viewer must experience the color as an enormous expanse: a field of color.
Harlem Renaissance: 
A cultural and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem between the end of W W I and the middle of the 1930s and beyond.  
During this period Harlem was a cultural center, drawing black writers, artists, musicians, and poets. 
Many had come from the South, fleeing its oppressive system to find a place to freely express their talents. 
The Renaissance incorporated jazz and the blues, attracting whites to Harlem speakeasies.
Take what you heard with your ears and try to translate that to what you would see with your eyes. 

Rhythm: in art, is a visual beat.
Color: can convey rhythm, by making your eyes travel from one component to another. 
Line: can produce rhythm by implying movement. 
Form: can cause rhythm by the ways in which they're placed one next to the other. 
Pattern: Regular repetition of an element 

Teacher Models 
Examples of vocabulary on the board throughout discussion 
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors room throughout discussion
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion ensure comprehension and active note taking 
Various Activities Designed to check/enhance student comprehension
Sam Gilliam Video
Students will watch video and take notes on Sam’s Comments about his art
Activity: Sketchbook Drawing: Students will listen to music and draw shapes from what they hear 
PROJECT Requirements:  Create a Paper Mache, Rhythm Sculpture exploring color, music, and emotion in the style of Sam Gilliam. 

Sketchbook: Sketchbook: Students will pick a piece of music and draw black and white construction plans for each side of their Rhythm sculpture and submit plans for approval. 
Required: Cardboard and foam core sketchbook plan construction
Abstract shape and rhythm with Sam Gilliam’s influence apparent
                        While sculptures are drying: students will add color and pattern to their sketchbook designs. 
Required: 
Analogous colors and values present on final sculpture
Pattern present on all sides of the sculpture
Must complete and paint All sides and angles of the sculpture (Details)

Final Project: Create a Paper Mache, Rhythm Sculpture exploring color, music, and emotion in the style of Sam Gilliam. 
Students will be assessed on: 
Effort in Class: Studio, Daily Art Link and Discussions 
Sturdy Paper Mache’ and covered newsprint. 
Use of a 3 color palette expressing emotion of song choice 
Use of one pattern on each side of final sculpture (4 total)
Must construct, gesso, paint sculpture from ALL Angles
Precision (Painting and Construction)
Cardboard Construction

How sculpture looks from ALL sides







Saturday, March 11, 2017

Art Element Cup


Lesson Objective: Introduction to the art elements through a styrofoam cup

Key Vocabulary: 

Materials: 
Styrofoam Cup
Xacto Knife 
Hot Glue 

Focus: Elements of Art 

CA Art Standards:
1.1 Identify and use the principles of design to discuss, analyze, and write about visual aspects in the environment and in works of art, including their own.
1.3 Research and analyze the work of an artist and write about the artist's distinctive style and its contribution to the meaning of the work.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
2.2 Prepare a portfolio of original two-and three-dimensional works of art that reflects refined craftsmanship and technical skills.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.3 Formulate and support a position regarding the aesthetic value of a specific work of art and change or defend that position after considering the views of others.
5.0 Connecting and Applying What Is Learned in the Visual Arts to Other Art Forms and Subject Areas and to Careers

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit art elements from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh previous knowledge.  Notes will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final project will be demo started in class using guided instruction.

Direct instruction: Art Elements: 

LINE
What is a line?
Geometrically, it connects two points. 
A line is a path traced by a moving point, i.e. a pencil point or a paintbrush. 
We see lines all around us. 
Line is a vital element of any artwork.
Actual 
Implied
Contour
Horizontal 
Vertical
Diagonal
Flat
Sharp/Angled
Gestural 

Actual Line: Marks or objects that are real lines; they exist physically. 
Examples of actual lines include lines painted on a highway, tree branches & Ladder.
Contour lines define the edges of objects:
Edges of a table
Edges of figure

Contour lines define both the edges of the object & the negative space between them
Implied Lines
Lines that we see in our mind’s eye that fill in the spaces between objects: 
Rows of windows in a large office building.
Outside line between fruit and background 
Sharply angled lines: Excitement, Anger, Danger & Chaos.
Gestural lines: reveal the touch of the artist’s hand, arm--and sometimes the entire body—in the artwork.
PROJECT: In Your sketchbook: 
Use your pencil
Draw three 3” squares
Try different ideas with a focus on LINE. 
How will you transition your line ideas to the cup? 

SHAPE: 
A shape is a closed line. A shape is flat.
The easiest way to see the shape of an object:  look at shadows. 
Shadows flatten a 3D object into a flat shape. 
Shadows enable you to see the object without details like color and texture.
Geometric Shape
Organic Shape
Implied Shape
Hard edge shape
Soft edge shape

Geometric shapes are mathematically determined
Organic shapes are the type you see in nature.
Implied Shape: The spaces between objects. We see those spaces as shapes, even though they are Implied. 
Hard Edged Shape: are clearly distinguished from each other 
Convey a sense of: 
order
clarity
strength.
Soft Edged Shape
Soft edged shapes have a tendency to blend with each other or the ground
Convey a sense of:
fluidity
flexibility
tend to feel lighter in weight.
PROJECT: In your sketchbook: Plan your cup using SHAPE
Use at one type of shape we discussed
organic
geometric
implied
hard edge
soft edge
When you have a concrete sketchbook plan completed/approved
Complete your plan using Practice cup and scissors 
If time allows, You can revisit: Line.

COLOR: 
Color has a huge effect on our daily lives.
Everyday our emotions, moods,  physical sensation (appetite) are influenced by the colors that surround us.
Primary: Red, Yellow, Blue
Secondary Colors: Green, Violet, Orange
Tertiary Colors: Yellow-Green, Yellow-Orange, Blue-Green, Blue-Violet, Red-Violet, Red-Orange
Complementary Colors
Colors Opposite on the color wheel: 
Red and Green
Yellow and Purple
Blue and Orange
High Contrast 
Draws attention
Analogous Colors
Colors Next door on the color wheel:
  Green and blue
Yellow and orange
Violet and red
Analogous colors blend with each other.

PROJECT: In your sketchbook: Plan your 3” Color cube side
Use at least two color schemes we discussed
Primary
Secondary
Tertiary 
Complementary
Analogous
When you have a concrete plan in place in your sketchbook:
Pick one of the 6 sides of your cube
Complete your plan using any materials provided 

VALUE : TINTS AND SHADES. VALUE is the lightness or darkness of a hue (color).
Pure Color (Hue) is located in the center of a value scale.
No added white or black
Color from the tube. 
Create lighter value by mixing white with pure color: This is called a TINT.
Create darker values by mixing black  with the Pure Color: This is called a SHADE.  

PROJECT: 
Create a Value Scale 
Hold your pencil in the middle to create a medium (pure) hue. 
Tint: Hold your pencil near the eraser
Shade: Hole your pencil near the lead. 
Create a five block value scale 
In your sketchbook: Plan value idea for the cup
Use value scale techniques we discussed
Add white and black to paint to show value scale
Use varying pressure with pencil to create value scale
 Use both techniques

When you have a concrete plan in place in your sketchbook:
Get it approved
Complete your plan using any materials provided 

Texture: The surface quality that can be seen and/or felt
Texture can be rough smooth soft or hard. (Actual) 
Textures do not always feel the way they look (visual).
The illusion of having physical texture.
Texture in 2D artwork
Artist gives the look of texture through the medium. 
Actual texture: the tactile qualities of the physical surface of the object. 

Differentiates from visual texture: It has a physical quality that can be felt by touch. 

PROJECT: In your sketchbook: 
Plan your texture for your cup
Use the two texture types we discussed
Visual
Tactile or Actual Texture

When you have a concrete Sketchbook plan approved 
Apply idea to your cup
Complete your plan using any materials provided 

SPACE: Positive shapes occupy positive space. 
The area around positive shapes (the background) is negative space. 
In this diagram, the negative shapes are as clear and distinct as the positive shapes.
Negative space: is the space around/between the subject(s) of an image. 
Negative space is most evident when the space around a subject forms an interesting/relevant shape. 
In this case, the NEGATIVE space: The Arrow. 
Space is  always a part of artwork
The setting a sculpture is in becomes part of how it is viewed and the overall effect 
Implied Space: Illusion. In two-dimensional (2D) work

PROJECT: In your sketchbook: Plan how you will show space in your cup
Use the types of Space we discussed
Positive/Negative
Implied
Overlapping
Size
Linear perspective 
When you have a concrete plan in place in your sketchbook:
Complete your plan using any materials provided 

FINAL PROJECT REQUIREMENTS: 
Design and create Art Elements Cup
Create sketchbook study of each element decision 
Complete each aspect of the cup with art elements based on knowledge gained in class discussions
Revise and refine final cup using various supplies provided 
Final cup should become a sculpture, must use all pieces of cup





Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Graffiti Stencil Project



Lesson Objective: Using Stencils, create a work of art with a message based on Graffiti History. 

Key Vocabulary: 
Graffiti is writing or drawings that have been scribbled, scratched, or sprayed illicitly on a wall in  public place.
   Stencil: a thin sheet of cardboard, plastic, or metal with a pattern or letters cut out of it, used to produce   the cut design on the surface below by the application of ink or paint through the holes.
Iconography: the visual images and symbols used in a work of art or the interpretation 
Symbols are something represented in the work of art—an object, an action, or a pattern
Symbols can be nonrepresentational item such as a color or a line

Materials: 
Crayola Air Brush
Crayola Markers
Heavy paper to cut stencils 
Cutting board
xacto Knives

Focus art: Graffiti 

CA Art Standards
1.5 Analyze the material used by a given artist and describe how its use influences the meaning of the work.
2.6 Create a two or three-dimensional work of art that addresses a social issue.
3.4 Discuss the purposes of art in selected contemporary cultures.
4.1 Articulate how personal beliefs, cultural traditions, and current social, economic, and political contexts influence the interpretation of the meaning or message in a work of art.
4.2 Compare the ways in which the meaning of a specific work of art has been affected over time because of changes in interpretation and context.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.2 Create a work of art that communicates a cross-cultural or universal theme taken from literature or history.

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit art elements from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh previous knowledge.  Notes on color, scale and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final project will be demo started in class using guided instruction.

Direct instruction:
Graffiti is writing or drawings that have been scribbled, scratched, or sprayed illicitly on a wall in  public place.
Graffiti ranges from written words to wall paintings, and it has existed since ancient times

Examples date back to Ancient Egypt & Ancient Greece
Both "graffiti" and its singular form "graffito" are from the Italian word graffiato ("scratched"). 
"Graffiti" in art history: works of art produced by scratching a design into a surface. 
Spray Paint and marker pens have become the most commonly used graffiti materials. 
In most countries, marking or painting property without the property owner's consent is considered defacement and vandalism, which is a punishable crime.
1981: Fab 5 Freddy's friendship with Debbie Harry influenced Blondie's single "Rapture" 
The video featured Jean-Michel Basquiat, and offered the first glimpse of a depiction of elements of graffiti in hip hop culture. 
1980’s Keith Haring was another well-known graffiti artist who brought Pop Art and graffiti to the commercial mainstream. 
Then we saw the emergence of the new stencil graffiti genre. Some of the first examples were created in 1981
Banksy starts using stencils almost exclusively by 2000
Works of art may not only have subject matter, they may also contain symbols
   
 Stencil: a thin sheet of cardboard, plastic, or metal with a pattern or letters cut out of it, used to produce the cut design on the surface below by the application of ink or paint through the holes.
Iconography: the visual images and symbols used in a work of art or the interpretation 
Symbols are something represented in the work of art—an object, an action, or a pattern

Symbols can be nonrepresentational item such as a color or a line
To become a symbol, people have to adopt or accept
The cross is a symbol of Christianity,  symbol of suffering
The Sun as the symbol of life and strength 
River is the symbol of eternal change/flowing
The eagle on the standard of America symbolizes strength
Emojis as symbols
Emoji facts: 
USA loves pizza emoji
Canada Loves poop emoji
Australia loves party symbols
Over all mostly happy faces

Project Requirements: 
Sketchbook: Students will complete a study of their stencils, repetition, overlapping, movement as a drawing. 
Their drawing should include a five symbols and a social/cultural message through color and symbols (Iconography)
They will finish their drawing using color.
Submit sketch to Morrison for Final paper
Students must create at least 5 stencils in card stock
Final Project: Using created stencils, student will use overlapping, repetition, pictures and symbols that represent you or your message as an artist. 

Using knowledge gained from the year, address several principles of art: Balance, Scale,  Rhythm, Unity, Movement, Emphasis, Contrast, Pattern





Mixed Media Collage Final Project






Mixed Media Collage Reproduction
• Must create a reproduction of work by any famous artist. 
• Minimum 12” X 18” 
Must incorporate: 
Blind contour
Create depth and/or perspective
Shading and value to create form:
USE ONE: Stippling, scumbling, hatching, cross hatching, etc. 
Tessellation OR Op art reference
Pop Art reference
One of the following: Oval action figure, gestural figure OR portrait
Visual and/or tactile texture
Color, emotion, mood
Newspaper and/or magazine 
Paint (watercolor or acrylic) 
Oil Pastel
Graphite pencil drawing
Pen and ink (sharpie OR black ink pen)
  • Required: Please complete the artist statement and final rubric. Blue tape both on the back.
  • Required: Title of work: incorporate original artist’s name into your title. 
  • One day to find your fine art inspiration
  • Four days of studio time, three days of independent work. 
  • Due with presentation, including: why you chose the artwork and how you incorporated each requirement. 

Final meets California Art Standards: 

  • 1.8 Analyze the works of a well-known artist as to the art media selected and the effect of that selection on the artist's style.
  • 2.1 Create original works of art of increasing complexity and skill in a variety of media that reflect their feelings and points of view.
  • 2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual.
  • 2.4 Demonstrate in their own works of art a personal style and an advanced proficiency in communicating an idea, theme, or emotion.
  • 2.6 Present a universal concept in a multimedia work of art that demonstrates knowledge of technology skills.
  • 3.2 Identify contemporary artists worldwide who have achieved regional, national, or international recognition and discuss ways in which their work reflects, plays a role in, and influences present-day culture. (artist statement question)
  • 4.1 Describe the relationship involving the art maker (artist), the making (process), the artwork (product), and the viewer.
  • 5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the symbols and images.













Crumpled Movement Landscape



Lesson Objective: Observe, identify and create movement in a landscape work. 

Key Vocabulary: 
Rhythm: Principle of Art: Art elements (line shape, value, color, texture) recur regularly. Like a dance it will have a flow of objects that will seem to be like the beat of music. 
Movement: Principle of Art: Art Principle:  the path the viewer's eye takes through the artwork, often to a focal area.
Watercolor: is a painting method in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water-based solution. Watercolor refers to both the medium and the resulting artwork.
Landscape is ANY picture of the outdoors
Foreground: The part of the picture that is closest to you.
Perspective: things look bigger when they are closer to you.
Middleground: The part of the picture in the middle.
Background is up by the Top of your paper. 
“Rule of Thirds” can be key to creating balance in landscape painting
Opacity: (O-pa-city):the condition of lacking transparency or translucence; opaqueness. 

Materials: 
Drawing Supplies: Colored pencils, drawing pencils, oil pastels
Watercolors
Watercolor Paper
One scrap paper per student: crumpled

Focus Artist: Van Gogh

CA Art Standards: 
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
1.5 Analyze the material used by a given artist and describe how its use influences the meaning of the work.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
2.4 Review and refine observational drawing skills.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.0 CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS: Students apply what they learn in the visual arts across subject areas.

Project Requirements: 
Sketchbook: Practice drawing a crumpled piece of paper on a blank sheet of your sketchbook. 
Turn that drawing of paper into hills on the horizon. 
Draw in the background and foreground. 
Use oil pastels and watercolors to create movement. 

Final Project: Student used blind contour technique to draw crumpled paper mountain range.
Student added interest, rhythm and movement to create landscape using oil pastels and watercolor. 
Student followed landscape procedures to add interest in foreground and background. 
Student used the “rule of three” and color to create emphasis.

Direct Instruction from Power Point: 
Landscape is ANY picture of the outdoors

The Foreground: The part of the picture that is closest to you. 
The foreground is at the bottom of the paper. 
Things in the foreground look big, have more detail and are darker
Perspective: things look bigger when they are closer to you.

The Middleground:
The part of the picture in the middle. 
The middle ground is part way between the foreground and the background.
It is that part of the picture that  is farthest away from you. 

The Background is up by the Top of your paper. 
Things in the background look smaller, less detail and lighter because they are farther away. 

Overlapping is when one thing seems to cover up another thing, even just a little. When this happens, the thing that looks like it is on top is the thing that’s closest to you.

COLOR and Landscape: Warm and cool – Use the power of warm and colors to add even more depth. 
Add a red highlight in the foreground to bring your viewers gaze forward and to heighten the effect. 
Warm in the foreground cools in the background
Color becomes less and less saturated (intense) as it disappears into the distance.
Everything gets lighter in value as the distance from the viewer increases
As the landscape hits the horizon line it is often very similar in value to the sky.

Balance in three’s 
The nature of something’s ingredients or constituents; the way in which a whole or mixture is made up.
2. The action of putting things together; formation or construction.
3 is the magic number: Balance
Composition is about variety just “don’t make any two things the same”

The “Rule of Thirds” can be key to creating balance in landscape painting
Divide your page horizontally into 3.
2. Decide whether to have your horizon on the top third or the bottom third 
(the bottom third is always easier to balance, it helps to make the sky look vast and imposing).
3. Split the vertical into thirds.
4. Align areas of focus at the intersection between the lines.

Vincent  van Gogh 
(1853 – 1890)
Dutch Post-Impressionist painter 
His work had a far-reaching influence on 20th century art
Known for his  vivid colors and emotional impact.
Van Gogh did not begin painting until his late twenties
Best-known works were produced during his final two years. 
He produced more than 2,000 artworks, consisting of around 900 paintings and 1,100 drawings and sketches. 
His work was a strong influence on the Modernist art that followed. 
Today many of his pieces—including his numerous self portraits, landscapes, portraits and sunflowers—are among the world's most recognizable and expensive works of art.
Known for his paint application creating texture and movement.
He suffered from anxiety and increasingly frequent bouts of mental illness throughout his life,
died largely unknown, at the age of 37
Sold only one painting while he was alive

Rhythm: Principle of Art: Art elements (line shape, value, color, texture) recur regularly. Like a dance it will have a flow of objects that will seem to be like the beat of music. 

Movement: Principle of Art: Art Principle:  the path the viewer's eye takes through the artwork, often to a focal area.

Watercolor: is a painting method in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water-based solution. Watercolor refers to both the medium and the resulting artwork.

Opacity: (O-pa-city):the condition of lacking transparency or translucence; opaqueness. 
Oil Pastel History: 1947 Picasso Convinced Henri Sennelier, a French manufacturer who specialized in high quality art products, to develop a fine arts version. 
In 1949 Sennelier produced the first oil pastels intended for professionals and experienced artists.

Oil Pastel TECHNIQUE: Press hard, Should look like paint, If your hand hurts, you are doing it right