Sunday, January 25, 2015




Lesson Objective 
Work with elements of art: Form, Shape, Color
Work with principles of Art: Balance 
Create a additive wooden sculpture in the style of Barbara Spring

Key Vocabulary: 
Additive: Is the process by which material is shaped and built up to create the desired image.
Achromatic:  Any color that lacks strong chromatic content is said to be unsaturated, achromatic, or near neutral. Pure achromatic colors include black, white and all grays; near neutrals include browns, tans, pastels and darker colors. Near neutrals can be of any hue or lightness.
Color Scheme: color scheme is the choice of colors used in design for a range of media. 
Assemblage: An assemblage is a sculpture constructed from found objects. Typically an assemblage does not disguise the original objects used, rather it either tries to show them in a new light, or forms a figurative sculpture from the collection of shapes.
Materials: 
Variety of wooden sticks
Craft Sticks
Tooth Picks
Coffee Stirrers
Wood chips
Brown craft crinkle
Glue:  white or wood

Focus Artist: 
Barbara Spring
Video for projection presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJcmv-3aUys

Project Requirements
Create a wooden cake in the style of Barbara spring using additive sculpture and assemblage. 

Assessment: 
Informal: Large group Oral Critique
Formal: Artist Statement
Formal: Grading final sculpture

CA STANDARDS: 
1.1 Identify and use the principles of design to discuss, analyze, and write about visual aspects in the environment and in works of art, including their own. 
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.1 Articulate how personal beliefs, cultural traditions, and current social, economic, and political contexts influence the interpretation of the meaning or message in a work of art.
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.2 Create a work of art that communicates a cross-cultural or universal theme taken from literature or history.

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques, group activities to check for understanding
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 
Advanced art students will be asked to increase the difficulty of their final sculpture They will also be expected incorporate more details and principles into the final project

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit Shape, Color and Form from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh earlier learning.  Notes on Art history, Key Vocabulary and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final sculpture will be demo started in class using guided instruction. 

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Art Link: 
Small Group Critique Barbara Spring’s A La Carte 
Describe
Analyze
Interpret
Large Group Critique 
INTRODUCTION: Barbara Spring Video

OBJECTIVE: Create Wooden cake using various wood pieces for structure and decoration
Students will understand new vocabulary as is relates to visual art
Students will discover review the elements of Shape, color and Form. They look at the artwork of Barbara Spring and use additive and assemblage techniques to create cake form with neutral/achromatic color format 
Discussion:
ART HISTORY: Barbara Spring 
Barbara Spring (1916- 2011)  94 years old
An exceptional wood sculptor, 
Barbara Spring's career began in 1935 in her native England 
She studied at the Gravesend School of Art in Kent and the Central School of Art in London. 
Her exhibits in this country span from 1962 to present.
Actively worked at the studio she built in 1972 next to her home in Big Sur. 
"Barbara is Magic.” "She can give an ordinary face so much emotion." says Greg Hawthorne of the Hawthorne Gallery, where much of her work is exhibited. 
She pokes fun at the human frailties of her characters, their pettiness, self-importance and self-doubt
Spring's gentle sense of humor makes them sympathetically engaging. 
Her keen observation of human nature and genius for creating the subtlest nuances are further enhanced by punning titles like "Major Faupar" and "Upton O'Goode".
Watch Video
Key Vocabulary:
Additive: Is the process by which material is shaped and built up to create the desired image.
Achromatic:  Any color that lacks strong chromatic content is said to be unsaturated, achromatic, or near neutral. Pure achromatic colors include black, white and all grays; near neutrals include browns, tans, pastels and darker colors. Near neutrals can be of any hue or lightness.
Color Scheme: color scheme is the choice of colors used in design for a range of media. 
Assemblage: An assemblage is a sculpture constructed from found objects. Typically an assemblage does not disguise the original objects used, rather it either tries to show them in a new light, or forms a figurative sculpture from the collection of shapes.
Teacher Models 
Examples of vocabulary on the board throughout discussion 
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors room throughout discussion
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion ensure comprehension and active note taking 
Various Activities Designed to check/enhance student comprehension
Activity: 
Using 24 craft sticks, students build triangle shape for cake base
Using various wood “toppings”
Student decorate the top of the cake using achromatic color palette. 

FINAL PROJECT: 
Rubric Project: Create Wooden cake using various wood pieces for structure and decoration
Students will understand new vocabulary as is relates to visual art
Students will discover review the elements of Shape, color and Form. They look at the artwork of Barbara Spring and use additive and assemblage techniques to create cake form with neutral/achromatic color format 

Students will be assessed on: 
Effort in Class: Studio, Daily Art Link and Discussions 
Additive wood construction precise and cake like. 

Use of a neutral color palette for construction and toppings How sculpture looks from ALL sides

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Slotted Color Sculptures with Josef Albers



Lesson Objective
Work with elements of art: Color 
Work with principles of Art: Scale 
Create a Slotted color sculpture exploring color relationships 

Key Vocabulary: 
Hue
Value
Intensity
Chroma
Saturation
Contrast 
Complementary Colors
Simultaneous Contrast 
Successive Contrast 
Color Schemes (relationships)

Materials: 
Foam Core 
Paint
Exato Knives

Focus Artists: 
Josef Albers 

Beg: Project Requirements: Create a Slotted color sculpture exploring color relationships 
Sketchbook: Students will draw color plans for each side of their slotted sculpture and
submit plans for approval. Required: 
Square slotted format for each side (Construction)
Color Relationships (5 different schemes minimum)
Color Placement (Neighbors/Scale)
All sides and angles of the sculpture (Details)
Scale as it pertains to final look of sculpture
Create Free-standing Slotted Sculpture exploring Josef Albers studies on color
Precision (Painting and Slot Construction)
Scale (How color looks from ALL sides)

Adv: Project Requirements: Create a Slotted color sculpture exploring color relationships 
Sketchbook: Students will draw color plans for each side of their slotted sculpture and submit plans for approval. Required:
Slotted, one shape format for each side (Construction)
Color Relationships (8 different schemes, minimum)
Color Placement (Neighbors)
All sides and angles of the sculpture (Details)
Scale as it pertains to final look of sculpture
Create Free-standing Slotted Sculpture exploring Josef Albers color studies 
Precision (Painting and Slot Construction)
Scale (How color looks from ALL sides)

Assessment: 
Informal: Written Peer Critique
Formal: Artist Statement
Formal: Grading final sculpture

CA STANDARDS: 
1.1 Identify and use the principles of design to discuss, analyze, and write about visual aspects in the environment and in works of art, including their own. 
1.3 Research and analyze the work of an artist and write about the artist's distinctive style and its contribution to the meaning of the work.
1.5 Analyze the material used by a given artist and describe how its use influences the meaning of the work.
2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual. 
4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.
5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the images

Modifications: 
English Language Learner: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Special Needs: Handout for project, project samples, Power point with visuals, Critique for additional understanding, Demonstration of techniques
Accelerated Learner: Expand on skills learned to create a unique project. 
Advanced art students will be asked to increase the difficulty of their final sculpture They will also be expected incorporate 8 color schemes in final sculpture. 

Scaffolding adaptations: 
Students will revisit color and line from the earlier learning. We will use similar visuals to refresh earlier learning.  Notes on color, scale and artists will be taken throughout discussions for added understanding. Creating sketchbook plans and Constructing final sculpture will be demo started in class using guided instruction. 

Art Link: 
Science and Art
How have we used science in the course already? 

INTRODUCTION to lesson (Anticipatory set): 
Watch a video on Josef Albers and his work 
Use discussion form to enhance learning

OBJECTIVE: Using Slotted Sculpture as your 3-D Form 
Create Free-Standing Artwork exploring 6 different color Schemes/Relationships
Must Complete Sculpture from all Angles
Discuss Science and Art as pre-assessment
Discuss and practice drawing your final project on paper
Work closely with teacher before moving to foam core
Students will understand new vocabulary as is relates to visual art: 
PURPOSE: Complete Free-Standing, Slotted sculpture exploring color relationships. 

INSTRUCTION: 
Students will discover review the elements of color and Scale. they look at the artwork of Josef Calder and create a Slotted sculpture piece as a final art project. 

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Day 1 and 2: Power Point Presentation Color and Albers
Pre-assessment: Science and Art
Opening: Art Link: Quote from Albers on Science and Art
Review: Elements of art 
Discussion: Color
Key Vocabulary featured on PPT with visuals: 
Hue
Value
Intensity
Chroma
Saturation
Contrast 
Complementary Colors
Simultaneous Contrast 
Successive Contrast 
Color Schemes (relationships)

ART HISTORY: Josef Albers 
German-born American artist and educator 
He worked, both in Europe and in the United States
Taught at Yale University
He formed the basis for the most influential and far-reaching art education programs of the 20th century.
Studied color with paper
Avoids mixing paint
Saves time and materials
Gain active interest, no prep
Precision of tone, light and surface quality
No texture (i.e. brush strokes)
Huedoku: Students play the app Huedoku to see their learning at work. The app is created from Albers studies and allows students to place colors in the right order based on hue. Students will both watch and play. Student playing will be active in color placement students watching will observe how color changes based on its neighbors. 
Review each Color scheme on last slide to check for understanding 
Teacher Models: 
Color throughout discussion 
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors throughout discussion
The game Huedoku on how to play with three color boxes 
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion ensure comprehension and active note taking 
Students play the Huedoku App with 4 color boxes and higher

Present Rubric through Power Point Slides: 
FINAL PROJECT:  Using color relationships considering colors will be placed next to each other on final sculpture 
Students will draw  plans for their Color sculpture before moving to paint stage
They must consider:
Color Relationships
Color Placement
All sides and angles of the sculpture
Scale as it pertains to final look of color on sculpture
Create Free-standing Slotted Sculpture exploring Josef Albers studies on color

Day 3: Students receive a full day to create and label their five color schemes 
Students show me their color schemes to show understanding and receive foam core
Day 4: Students measure and cut slots based on model I presented or their own ideas. 
Student will use exact knives to achieve slot cuts
Safety Measures in place: 
Watch a video about how to cut slots on youtube
Teacher passes out and retrieves exacto knives 
Students must have a partner also ready to make cuts before receiving 
exacto knife
Students are reminded about keeping thumbs in and watching partners
throughout exacto use
Teacher monitors exacto knives by observing each table throughout 
class time. 
Day 5: Slot Cutting Continues
Day 6: Students begin paint planning
Once slots are in place and structure is complete
Students will begin to add paint lines and details on the final sculpture
This planning will help complete painting of each color scheme
Paint is applied in the style of Josef Albers Squares
Day 7: Painting Continues
Albers Reflection through Art Link (15 Minutes)
Students read a quote from Josef Albers
They are reminded about how we got to this stage of our sculpture
They are asked to read through their notes and find their favorite fact as a table 
group
They discuss and expand on the fact and present their discussion to the class
This will prepare students for upcoming Critique
Students are asked to take notes on this process for Friday sketchbook checks
Students return to their stage of the sculpture 
Day 8: Full studio Day
All students should begin the painting Process today
Check the room for students who are lingering in the slot phase or color 
planning phase
Day 9: Critiques: 
Peer Critiques
Directions: Present to the class first by Power Point
Show the rubric on Power Point 
Review Rubric Goals
Remind students to critique by rubric
Students can partner with anyone in the room but a table mate
Students will exchange sculptures 
Each student will create a written critique about their partners work
Each student should address goals achieved and goal 
opportunities
Students should use the name Albers at least once
Students should refer to a Rubric Goal at least twice
Students should incorporate key vocabulary throughout. 
Critique is based on Rubric Goals
Students will exchange their written critiques
Read and discuss new goals with their partner
Day 10: Full studio Day 
Focus on New Goals from yesterday critique
Focus on getting to the halfway mark of your painting process
Day 11: Full studio Day 
All should be at the 3/4 way mark by the end of the day 
Day 12: Final day of sculpture (November 10)
Students should complete sculpture today and be ready for Artist Statement 
Turn in completed sculptures at the end of the period. 


Day 13: Artist Statement (November 12)




Cool new App for Art Education


         Cool new Art App for your classroom: Huedoku. The application is a color puzzle that puts Josef Alber’s experiments into practice. Alber’s insisted that education should be a practice of search vs. research. This app finally puts his ideas into motion at a teenagers pace. Students search for the solve to the color puzzles without realizing they are discovering color theory. The app works for all learners. While advanced learners may solve the puzzles more quickly, special education and ELL students are pulled in by the visuals and excited to play along. By using apple TV to project the game on the large white board, students can play as a large group or table by table. 
        After studying Albers theories and practices on color for a full class period, I needed a fun in-between to pull students into the concept of working with color for a 3-D project. This app was the perfect solution. It incorporated all students and was immediately engaging. We started by completing the three sided puzzles together, as a large group. Using my iPad and a projector, I picked up the color and students would tell me where to place it in projected puzzle. As soon as the puzzle was solved, we moved on to the next one. The students loved the app. We solved all three sided puzzles together, as modeled practice, then we went into small table groups for the four sided puzzles. I gave the first table the iPad and they worked as a four person group to solve the puzzle. While this group was actively working on the puzzle, the classroom was watching them solve the projection on the large screen. More importantly, they observing how colors change when they are placed next to a new background. It was Albers in action and the students had no idea how much they were learning as they played along. These were the strengths of the activity. I ran into only one challenge, after students played a first time with their table groups, they really wanted to play again. It led me to contemplate how I could get more iPads so we could have students playing at each table simultaneously. This was a small challenge considering that by observing and waiting, these students were gaining so much from watching the color interaction. 

I will continue to use this app. I will also use this success as an opportunity to grow. I would like to find more apps like this to use in the classroom. I believe students today need relatable, technology to be included in their learning. It allows me to increase understanding using a familiar, everyday item (iPad) that students utilize and comprehend. It was exciting to see the energy and camaraderie in the classroom. I would love to grow by finding more art application opportunities for the 3-D classroom.  Check it out: http://huedoku.com/

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Value Pulling with Mike Henderson



Mike Henderson, Upstairs (not in crocker) Each way is at Crocker…similar

Recap: Colorwheel
Discussion: 
Value:
How do we make colors lighter?
How do we make colors darker?
What is value?
What is shade? 
What is tint? 
Draw a value scale

Artist: 
Born in the small farming town of Marshall, Missouri, in 1944
Mike Henderson was supposed to work in the local factory with his father. 
His passion for art led him across the country to one of the first integrated art schools in the United States, the San Francisco Art Institute. 
He earned a B.F.A. in 1969 and an M.F.A. in 1970. 
Henderson has been teaching art and art history at the University of California at Davis ever since
He is considered a prominent figure among the second generation of Bay Area abstract painters.

Project: Create a Mike Henderson inspired Value piece by pulling paint

Step1: With the long side of a craft stick, pick up white and any pure color
Step2: Place it on your paper and pull it across to create a new color
Step3: allow the mixing to show, so you get many colors in each pull
Step4: try and create a rectangle with each pull
Step5: repeat the process with each of your pure colors with black and white
Use a paper towel to wipe craft stick between
Step6: feel free to break your stick to get new shapes with your pulls

Materials: 
White paint 
Black Paint
Pure colors of paint, primary and secondary for each student
Pulls: pop sticks, illustration board 
Large Card stock White 








Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Pop Art Clay with Wayne Thiebaud



Art Link: 
Compare Pop art and Op art
What is pop short for
What artist do you associate with Pop art? 
If you had to create a Pop art project what would you create? 

INTRODUCTION to lesson (Anticipatory set): 
Show Wayne Thiebaud’s ice cream
Analyze
Describe
Interpret

OBJECTIVE: Create clay sculpture inspired by Wayne Thiebaud’s desserts
Score Slip Hand-built Subtractive sculpture
Additive Sculpture Pop Art Texture
Physical Texture Visual texture Leather hard
Bone Dry

CA STANDARDS: 
1.1 Analyze and discuss complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual in works of art.
1.3 Research and analyze the work of an artist and write about the artist's distinctive style and its contribution to the meaning of the work.
1.6 Describe the use of the elements of art to express mood in one or more of their works of art.
1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.
2.1 Create original works of art of increasing complexity and skill in a variety of media that reflect their feelings and points of view.
2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual.
3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.
4.4 Articulate the process and rationale for refining and reworking one of their own works of art.
5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the symbols and images.
5.3 Prepare portfolios of their original works of art for a variety of purposes (e.g., review for post secondary application, exhibition, job application, and personal collection).

PURPOSE: Complete a clay sculpture with texture and an emotional mood based on the art element color. 

INSTRUCTION: 
Students will receive details about Pop Art
Hand built sculpture
Pop Artists
Mood and emotion in art

MATERIALS: 
Clay
Toothpicks
Clay tools
Slip
Acrylic paint

DIRECT INSTRUCTION:
Day 1: Power Point Presentation Pop Art
Opening: Art Link: Compare Op Art to Pop art
What is pop short for?
When you hear the words Pop Art what artist comes to mind? 
If you were asked to create a Pop Art project, what would you 
Create? 
Pre-assessment: Sketchbook: Wayne Thiebaud’s Ice Cream Cones
How does this art effect you? 
Review: Describe, analyze, interpret
Teacher Models: 
Pop Art and art History
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors throughout discussion
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion to be sure notes are being taken 
Presentation assessment
Art Activity: Critique Claes Oldenburg’s Dropped Cone
Think-Pair-Share Table Groups
Describe, Analyze, Interpret
Discussion: Pop Art
History
Pop Art defined
Pop Art Characteristics
ART HISTORY: Wayne Thiebaud
VIDEO
Critique works of dessert
Color 
Texture
Bio Info
Claes Oldenburg steals from Wayne
We steal from them both!!!

Sketchbook Activity: 
Begin to sketch your final clay project


Day 2: Texture and Color
Art Link: What is Pop Art, compare to Op art
Relate texture to the Wayne Thiebaud video from
                        yesterday
Discussion: Texture and Color
What is Texture? 
Physical Texture
Visual Texture
Color: Mood and emotion
Teacher Models: 
Texture and color
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors throughout discussion
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion to be sure notes are being taken 
Presentation assessment

Sketchbook Activity: 
Continue to sketch your final clay project add texture and color
Day 3:
Art Link: 
What mood does this piece show? 
Discussion: Sculpture
Additive
Subtractive
Scoring and slipping
Teacher Models: 
Clay construction Pinch Pot and slab pot
Students take notes in their sketchbooks 
Teacher Monitors throughout discussion
Check for Understanding: 
Monitor room during Pre-assessment in sketchbook
Monitor throughout discussion to be sure notes are being taken 
Presentation assessment
Sketchbook Activity: 
Continue to sketch your final clay project add texture and color and add 
Plans for scoring and slipping the final project. 
Day 4, 5, 6: create clay and allow it to get leather hard add texture/details when leather 
hard
Final Dry time art activity Day 7 and 8: 
Each table will receive research paper on one of nine artists
Students will read, collect data and present one artist to the class as a
Group
Presentation will be of a group artwork inspired by their artist. 
Artwork must be of the subject matter most identified with the artist
Artwork must include characteristics of the artist
Students will aid in instruction by researching one of nine artists and sharing the information with the class. 
Students will take notes in their sketchbook about each of the nine artists
Wayne Theibaud
Jasper johns
Andy Warhol
Jim Dine
Roy Lichtenstein
Tom Wesselman
Claes Oldenburg
David Hockney
Robert Indiana
FINAL PROJECT Painting: Day 9, 10, 11, 12
Students will paint clay sculpture using Pop Art style
Students will use color/texture to achieve an emotion or mood





Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Typography and Pattern with Lou Dorfsman



Discussion: 
Typography
What does it mean? 
Where do we see it? Daily lives, Computer

ARTIST
Louis "Lou" Dorfsman (1918 – October 22, 2008) was a graphic designer who oversaw almost every aspect of the advertising and corporate identity for the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) in his 40 years with the network.
In Eero Saarinen's CBS Building on 52nd Street and Sixth Avenue, Dorfsman was responsible for all of the building's graphics, designating the type, design and spacing for wall clocks, elevator buttons, and elevator inspection stickers.[2] He designed a 35-foot-wide (11 m), 8 1⁄2-foot-tall (2.6 m) design called Gastrotypographicalassemblage for the building's cafeteria that listed all of the foods offered to patrons in hand-milled wood type. Dorfsman considered this work to be "his magnum opus, his gift to the world".[3] The work has now been installed in a building on the campus of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York.

Pattern
What is pattern? 
How do we create pattern in art? 

Project
Step1: Grab small square of practice paper
Step2: Practice your letter
Step 3: Make suer the letter is open, like a coloring book 
Step4: Fill the page
Step4: get your letter approved by an adult
Step5: Recreate your letter on the page with type
Step6: Make sure your type page in long ways
Step7: Draw your letter again in the same manner as your practice
Step 8: Fill Your letter with pattern
Step9: Turn in your letter to mrs. Mollie

Materials: 
Pre-cut paper with type
Thin Sharpie markers
Practice paper
Sticky notes for each student with their letter on it (ABC etc). 



Tuesday, May 27, 2014

High School Art Final

Mixed Media Collage Reproduction
• Must create a reproduction of work by any famous artist. 
• Minimum 12” X 18” 
Must incorporate: 
Blind contour
Create depth and/or perspective
Shading and value to create form:
USE ONE: Stippling, scumbling, hatching, cross hatching, etc. 
Tessellation OR Op art reference
Pop Art reference
One of the following: Oval action figure, gestural figure OR portrait
Visual and/or tactile texture
Color, emotion, mood
Newspaper and/or magazine 
Paint (watercolor or acrylic) 
Oil Pastel
Graphite pencil drawing
Pen and ink (sharpie OR black ink pen)
  • Required: Please complete the artist statement and final rubric. Blue tape both on the back.
  • Required: Title of work: incorporate original artist’s name into your title. 
  • One day to find your fine art inspiration
  • Four days of studio time, three days of independent work. 
  • Due on May 28 with presentation, including: why you chose the artwork and how you incorporated each requirement. 


Final meets California Art Standards: 

  • 1.8 Analyze the works of a well-known artist as to the art media selected and the effect of that selection on the artist's style.
  • 2.1 Create original works of art of increasing complexity and skill in a variety of media that reflect their feelings and points of view.
  • 2.2 Plan and create works of art that reflect complex ideas, such as distortion, color theory, arbitrary color, scale, expressive content, and real versus virtual.
  • 2.4 Demonstrate in their own works of art a personal style and an advanced proficiency in communicating an idea, theme, or emotion.
  • 2.6 Present a universal concept in a multimedia work of art that demonstrates knowledge of technology skills.
  • 3.2 Identify contemporary artists worldwide who have achieved regional, national, or international recognition and discuss ways in which their work reflects, plays a role in, and influences present-day culture. (artist statement question)
  • 4.1 Describe the relationship involving the art maker (artist), the making (process), the artwork (product), and the viewer.
  • 5.2 Compare and contrast works of art, probing beyond the obvious and identifying psychological content found in the symbols and images.